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The ecology and evolution of wildlife cancers: Applications for management and conservation

Hamede, Rodrigo, Owen, Rachel, Siddle, Hannah, Peck, Sarah, Jones, Menna, Dujon, Antoine M., Giraudeau, Mathieu, Roche, Benjamin, Ujvari, Beata and Thomas, Frédéric 2020, The ecology and evolution of wildlife cancers: Applications for management and conservation, Evolutionary Applications, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1111/eva.12948.

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Title The ecology and evolution of wildlife cancers: Applications for management and conservation
Author(s) Hamede, Rodrigo
Owen, Rachel
Siddle, Hannah
Peck, Sarah
Jones, Menna
Dujon, Antoine M.
Giraudeau, Mathieu
Roche, BenjaminORCID iD for Roche, Benjamin orcid.org/0000-0003-2391-2988
Ujvari, BeataORCID iD for Ujvari, Beata orcid.org/0000-0003-2391-2988
Thomas, Frédéric
Journal name Evolutionary Applications
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Hoboken, N.J.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1752-4563
1752-4571
Keyword(s) cancer
disease ecology
host-pathogen interactions
natural selection
transmissible tumour
wildlife management
Summary Evolutionary Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Ecological and evolutionary concepts have been widely adopted to understand host–pathogen dynamics, and more recently, integrated into wildlife disease management. Cancer is a ubiquitous disease that affects most metazoan species; however, the role of oncogenic phenomena in eco-evolutionary processes and its implications for wildlife management and conservation remains undeveloped. Despite the pervasive nature of cancer across taxa, our ability to detect its occurrence, progression and prevalence in wildlife populations is constrained due to logistic and diagnostic limitations, which suggests that most cancers in the wild are unreported and understudied. Nevertheless, an increasing number of virus-associated and directly transmissible cancers in terrestrial and aquatic environments have been detected. Furthermore, anthropogenic activities and sudden environmental changes are increasingly associated with cancer incidence in wildlife. This highlights the need to upscale surveillance efforts, collection of critical data and developing novel approaches for studying the emergence and evolution of cancers in the wild. Here, we discuss the relevance of malignant cells as important agents of selection and offer a holistic framework to understand the interplay of ecological, epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of cancer in wildlife. We use a directly transmissible cancer (devil facial tumour disease) as a model system to reveal the potential evolutionary dynamics and broader ecological effects of cancer epidemics in wildlife. We provide further examples of tumour–host interactions and trade-offs that may lead to changes in life histories, and epidemiological and population dynamics. Within this framework, we explore immunological strategies at the individual level as well as transgenerational adaptations at the population level. Then, we highlight the need to integrate multiple disciplines to undertake comparative cancer research at the human–domestic–wildlife interface and their environments. Finally, we suggest strategies for screening cancer incidence in wildlife and discuss how to integrate ecological and evolutionary concepts in the management of current and future cancer epizootics.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/eva.12948
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0603 Evolutionary Biology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136551

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.