Openly accessible

Impact of electronic medication reconciliation interventions on medication discrepancies at hospital transitions: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Mekonnen, Alemayehu, Abebe, TB, McLachlan, AJ and Brien, JAE 2016, Impact of electronic medication reconciliation interventions on medication discrepancies at hospital transitions: A systematic review and meta-analysis, BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1186/s12911-016-0353-9.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
mekonnen-impactofelectronic-2016.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.48MB 13

Title Impact of electronic medication reconciliation interventions on medication discrepancies at hospital transitions: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Author(s) Mekonnen, AlemayehuORCID iD for Mekonnen, Alemayehu orcid.org/0000-0002-6826-4817
Abebe, TB
McLachlan, AJ
Brien, JAE
Journal name BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
Volume number 16
Issue number 1
Article ID 112
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-08-22
ISSN 1472-6947
Keyword(s) Electronic medication reconciliation
Medication history
Medication safety
Medication errors
Medication discrepancies
Care transition
Summary Background: Medication reconciliation has been identified as an important intervention to minimize the incidence of unintentional medication discrepancies at transitions in care. However, there is a lack of evidence for the impact of information technology on the rate and incidence of medication discrepancies identified during care transitions. This systematic review was thus, aimed to evaluate the impact of electronic medication reconciliation interventions on the occurrence of medication discrepancies at hospital transitions. Methods: Systematic literature searches were performed in MEDLINE, PubMed, CINHAL, and EMBASE from inception to November, 2015. We included published studies in English that evaluated the effect of information technology on the incidence and rate of medication discrepancies compared with usual care. Cochrane's tools were used for assessment of the quality of included studies. We performed meta-analyses using random-effects models. Results: Ten studies met our inclusion criteria; of which only one was a randomized controlled trial. Interventions were carried out at various hospital transitions (admission, 5; discharge, 2 and multiple transitions, 3 studies). Meta-analysis showed a significant reduction of 45 % in the proportion of medications with unintentional discrepancies after the use of electronic medication reconciliation (RR 0.55; 95 % CI 0.51 to 0.58). However, there was no significant reduction in either the proportion of patients with medication discrepancies or the mean number of discrepancies per patient. Drug omissions were the most common types of unintended discrepancies, and with an electronic tool a significant but heterogeneously distributed reduction of omission errors over the total number of medications reconciled have been observed (RR 0.20; 95 % CI 0.06 to 0.66). The clinical impact of unintended discrepancies was evaluated in five studies, and there was no potentially fatal error identified and most errors were minor in severity. Conclusion: Medication reconciliation supported by an electronic tool was able to minimize the incidence of medications with unintended discrepancy, mainly drug omissions. But, this did not consistently reduce other process outcomes, although there was a lack of rigorous design to conform these results.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12911-016-0353-9
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0806 Information Systems
1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136650

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 28 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 14 Abstract Views, 13 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 11 May 2020, 12:35:38 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.