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Clinically feasible brain morphometric similarity network construction approaches with restricted magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions

King, Daniel J and Wood, Amanda G 2020, Clinically feasible brain morphometric similarity network construction approaches with restricted magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions, Network neuroscience, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 274-291, doi: 10.1162/netn_a_00123.

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Title Clinically feasible brain morphometric similarity network construction approaches with restricted magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions
Author(s) King, Daniel J
Wood, Amanda GORCID iD for Wood, Amanda G orcid.org/0000-0002-1537-6858
Journal name Network neuroscience
Volume number 4
Issue number 1
Start page 274
End page 291
Total pages 18
Publisher MIT Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Mass.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2472-1751
Keyword(s) Cognition
Connectome
Morphology
Morphometric similarity networks
Structural MRI
Summary Morphometric similarity networks (MSNs) estimate organization of the cortex as a biologically meaningful set of similarities between anatomical features at the macro- and microstructural level, derived from multiple structural MRI (sMRI) sequences. These networks are clinically relevant, predicting 40% variance in IQ. However, the sequences required (T1w, T2w, DWI) to produce these networks are longer acquisitions, less feasible in some populations. Thus, estimating MSNs using features from T1w sMRI is attractive to clinical and developmental neuroscience. We studied whether reduced-feature approaches approximate the original MSN model as a potential tool to investigate brain structure. In a large, homogenous dataset of healthy young adults (from the Human Connectome Project, HCP), we extended previous investigations of reduced-feature MSNs by comparing not only T1w-derived networks, but also additional MSNs generated with fewer MR sequences, to their full acquisition counterparts. We produce MSNs that are highly similar at the edge level to those generated with multimodal imaging; however, the nodal topology of the networks differed. These networks had limited predictive validity of generalized cognitive ability. Overall, when multimodal imaging is not available or appropriate, T1w-restricted MSN construction is feasible, provides an appropriate estimate of the MSN, and could be a useful approach to examine outcomes in future studies.
Language eng
DOI 10.1162/netn_a_00123
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136720

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.