Openly accessible

How is patient safety understood by healthcare professionals? The case of Bhutan

Pelzang, Rinchen and Hutchinson, Alison 2020, How is patient safety understood by healthcare professionals? The case of Bhutan, Journal of Patient Safety, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 106-109, doi: 10.1097/PTS.0000000000000450.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
pelzang-howispatient-2020.pdf Published version application/pdf 150.60KB 1

Title How is patient safety understood by healthcare professionals? The case of Bhutan
Author(s) Pelzang, Rinchen
Hutchinson, AlisonORCID iD for Hutchinson, Alison orcid.org/0000-0001-5065-2726
Journal name Journal of Patient Safety
Volume number 16
Issue number 1
Start page 106
End page 109
Total pages 4
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA
Publication date 2020-03
ISSN 1549-8417
1549-8425
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Policy & Services
Bhutan
healthcare professionals
patient safety
understanding
INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION
MEDICAL-STUDENTS
IMPROVEMENT
EDUCATION
Summary Objective: The aim of the study was to explore how the term patient safety is understood by healthcare professionals (nurses, educators, doctors, ward managers, senior managers, and health assistants), all of whom are responsible for promoting the patient safety agenda in the Bhutanese healthcare system. 
 
Methods: The study was conducted as a naturalistic inquiry using qualitative exploratory descriptive inquiry. A purposeful sample of 94 healthcare professionals and managers was recruited from three different hospitals, a training institute, and the Ministry of Health. Data were collected via in-depth individual interviews. All data were subsequently analyzed using thematic analysis strategies.
 
Results: Data analysis revealed variation in the understanding of patient safety among healthcare professionals. Although most participants understood patient safety as fundamentally concerning “doing no harm” or “reducing the risk of harm or injuries” to patients, some understood patient safety as simply having sturdy infrastructure/buildings with sufficient space to manage public health emergencies such as earthquakes, floods, and epidemics. Some confused patient safety with quality of care and patient rights.
 
Conclusions: Inadequate understanding of the term patient safety has potential to hinder improvement of patient safety processes and practices in the Bhutanese healthcare system. To improve patient safety in Bhutan’s healthcare system, patient safety training and education need to be provided to all categories of healthcare professionals.
Language eng
DOI 10.1097/PTS.0000000000000450
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136739

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 4 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 11 May 2020, 13:08:59 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.