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Salt-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors (KABs) among victorian adults following 22-months of a consumer awareness campaign

Grimes, Carley A, Khokhar, Durreajam, Bolton, Kristy A, Trieu, Kathy, Potter, Jane, Davidson, Chelsea, Dunford, Elizabeth K, Jan, Stephen, Woodward, Mark, Bolam, Bruce, Neal, Bruce, Nowson, Caryl and Webster, Jacqui 2020, Salt-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors (KABs) among victorian adults following 22-months of a consumer awareness campaign, Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.3390/nu12051216.

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Title Salt-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors (KABs) among victorian adults following 22-months of a consumer awareness campaign
Author(s) Grimes, Carley AORCID iD for Grimes, Carley A orcid.org/0000-0002-9123-1888
Khokhar, Durreajam
Bolton, Kristy AORCID iD for Bolton, Kristy A orcid.org/0000-0001-6721-4503
Trieu, Kathy
Potter, Jane
Davidson, Chelsea
Dunford, Elizabeth K
Jan, Stephen
Woodward, Mark
Bolam, Bruce
Neal, Bruce
Nowson, CarylORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Webster, Jacqui
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 12
Issue number 5
Article ID 1216
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-05-01
ISSN 2072-6643
2072-6643
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
salt
sodium
knowledge
attitude
behavior
parents
Australia
Summary The Australian population consumes more salt than recommended and this increases the risk of raised blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. In 2015, a state-wide initiative was launched in the Australian state of Victoria to reduce population salt intake. This study examines whether salt-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors (KABs) of Victorian adults changed following the first 22 months of a consumer awareness campaign targeting parents. Repeated cross-sectional surveys of adults (18–65 years) recruited from research panels. Analyses were weighted to reflect the Victorian population. In both surveys mean age of participants (1584 in 2015 and 2141 in 2018) was 41 years, and 51% were female. This includes 554 parents/caregivers in 2015 and 799 in 2018. Most indicators of KAB remained unchanged. Among parents/caregivers the percentage who agreed limiting salt in their child’s diet was important increased by 8% (p = 0.001), and there was a 10% reduction in the percentage who reported placing a saltshaker on the table and a 9% reduction in those who reported their child added salt at the table (both p < 0.001). Some small adverse effects on other indicators were also observed. During the first 22 months of a salt reduction consumer awareness campaign, there were limited changes in KAB overall, however the target audience reported positive changes regarding their children, which aligned with the campaign messages.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu12051216
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136871

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.