Changes in Job Security and Mental Health: An Analysis of 14 Annual Waves of an Australian Working-Population Panel Survey

LaMontagne, Anthony, Too, LS, Punnett, L and Milner, Allison 2020, Changes in Job Security and Mental Health: An Analysis of 14 Annual Waves of an Australian Working-Population Panel Survey, American Journal of Epidemiology, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1093/aje/kwaa038.

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Title Changes in Job Security and Mental Health: An Analysis of 14 Annual Waves of an Australian Working-Population Panel Survey
Author(s) LaMontagne, AnthonyORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Too, LS
Punnett, L
Milner, AllisonORCID iD for Milner, Allison orcid.org/0000-0003-4657-0503
Journal name American Journal of Epidemiology
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2020-04-03
ISSN 0002-9262
1476-6256
Keyword(s) Job security
anxiety
depression
fixed effects
job insecurity
mental health
Summary Abstract We examined whether job security improvements were associated with improvements in mental health in a large, nationally representative panel study in Australia. We used both within-person fixed effects (FE) and random effects (RE) regression to analyze data from 14 annual waves covering the calendar period of 2002–2015 (19,169 persons; 106,942 observations). Mental Health Inventory–5 scores were modeled in relation to self-reported job security (categorical, quintiles), adjusting for age, year, education, and job change in the past year. Both FE and RE models showed stepwise improvements in Mental Health Inventory–5 scores with improving job security, with stronger exposure-outcome relationships in the RE models and for men compared with women. The RE coefficients for improvements in job security in men were 2.06 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.67, 2.46) for 1 quintile, steadily increasing for 2- (3.94 (95% CI: 3.54, 4.34)), 3- (5.82 (95% CI: 5.40, 6.24)), and 4-quintile (7.18 (95% CI: 6.71, 7.64)) improvements. The FE model for men produced slightly smaller coefficients, reaching a maximum of 5.55 (95% CI: 5.06, 6.05). This analysis, with improved causal inference over previous observational research, showed that improving job security is strongly associated with decreasing depression and anxiety symptoms. Policy and practice intervention to improve job security could benefit population mental health.
Notes In Press
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwaa038
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 01 Mathematical Sciences
11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30136936

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
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