White Matter Hyperintensities and the Progression of Frailty-The Tasmanian Study of Cognition and Gait

Siejka, T.P., Srikanth, V.K., Hubbard, R.E., Moran, C., Beare, R., Wood, Amanda, Phan, T., Balogun, S. and Callisaya, M.L. 2020, White Matter Hyperintensities and the Progression of Frailty-The Tasmanian Study of Cognition and Gait, The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, vol. 75, no. 8, pp. 1545-1550, doi: 10.1093/gerona/glaa024.

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Title White Matter Hyperintensities and the Progression of Frailty-The Tasmanian Study of Cognition and Gait
Author(s) Siejka, T.P.
Srikanth, V.K.
Hubbard, R.E.
Moran, C.
Beare, R.
Wood, AmandaORCID iD for Wood, Amanda orcid.org/0000-0002-1537-6858
Phan, T.
Balogun, S.
Callisaya, M.L.
Journal name The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences
Volume number 75
Issue number 8
Start page 1545
End page 1550
Total pages 6
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2020-08
ISSN 1079-5006
1758-535X
Keyword(s) MRI
Geriatric assessment
White matter hyperintensity
MRI
Summary Background The contribution of cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD) to the pathogenesis of frailty remains uncertain. We aimed to examine the associations between cSVD with progression of frailty in a population-based study of older people. Methods People aged between 60 and 85 years were randomly selected form the electoral roll to participate in the Tasmanian Study of Cognition and Gait. Participants underwent self-reported questionnaires, objective gait, cognitive and sensorimotor testing over three phases ranging between 2005 and 2012. These data were used to calculate a 41-item frailty index (FI) at three time points. Baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all participants to measure cSVD. Generalized mixed models were used to examine associations between baseline cSVD and progression of frailty, adjusted for confounders of age, sex, level of education, and total intracranial volume. Results At baseline (n = 388) mean age was 72 years (SD = 7.0), 44% were female, and the median FI score was 0.20 (interquartile range [IQR] 0.12, 0.27). In fully adjusted models higher burden of baseline white matter hyperintensity (WMH) was associated with frailty progression over 4.4 years (β = 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.05; p = .004) independent of other SVD markers. Neither baseline infarcts (p = .23), nor microbleeds at baseline (p = .65) were associated with progression of frailty. Conclusions We provide evidence for an association between baseline WMHs and progression of frailty. Our findings add to a growing body of literature suggesting WMH is a marker for frailty.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/gerona/glaa024
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30137173

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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