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Order of same-day concurrent training influences some indices of power development, but not strength, lean mass, or aerobic fitness in healthy, moderately-active men after 9 weeks of training

Lee, Matthew J. -C., Ballantyne, James K, Chagolla, Javier, Hopkins, William G., Fyfe, Jackson J., Phillips, , Stuart M., Bishop, David J. and Bartlett, Jonathan D. 2020, Order of same-day concurrent training influences some indices of power development, but not strength, lean mass, or aerobic fitness in healthy, moderately-active men after 9 weeks of training, PLoS ONE, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 1-24, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0233134.

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Title Order of same-day concurrent training influences some indices of power development, but not strength, lean mass, or aerobic fitness in healthy, moderately-active men after 9 weeks of training
Author(s) Lee, Matthew J. -C.
Ballantyne, James K
Chagolla, Javier
Hopkins, William G.
Fyfe, Jackson J.ORCID iD for Fyfe, Jackson J. orcid.org/0000-0002-9541-2336
Phillips, , Stuart M.
Bishop, David J.
Bartlett, Jonathan D.
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 15
Issue number 5
Article ID e0233134
Start page 1
End page 24
Total pages 24
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2020-05-01
ISSN 1932-6203
1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
SESSION EXERCISE SEQUENCE
NEUROMUSCULAR ADAPTATIONS
ENDURANCE EXERCISE
SKELETAL-MUSCLE
BODY-COMPOSITION
PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE
RESISTANCE EXERCISE
OXYGEN-CONSUMPTION
MUSCULAR STRENGTH
INTERFERENCE
Summary BackgroundThe importance of concurrent exercise order for improving endurance and resistance adaptations remains unclear, particularly when sessions are performed a few hours apart. We investigated the effects of concurrent training (in alternate orders, separated by ~3 hours) on endurance and resistance training adaptations, compared to resistance-only training.Materials and methodsTwenty-nine healthy, moderately-active men (mean ± SD; age 24.5 ± 4.7 y; body mass 74.9 ± 10.8 kg; height 179.7 ± 6.5 cm) performed either resistance-only training (RT, n = 9), or same-day concurrent training whereby high-intensity interval training was performed either 3 hours before (HIIT+RT, n = 10) or after resistance training (RT+HIIT, n = 10), for 3 d.wk-1 over 9 weeks. Training-induced changes in leg press 1-repetition maximal (1-RM) strength, countermovement jump (CMJ) performance, body composition, peak oxygen uptake (), aerobic power (), and lactate threshold () were assessed before, and after both 5 and 9 weeks of training.ResultsAfter 9 weeks, all training groups increased leg press 1-RM (~24–28%) and total lean mass (~3-4%), with no clear differences between groups. Both concurrent groups elicited similar small-to-moderate improvements in all markers of aerobic fitness ( ~8–9%; ~16-20%; ~14-15%). RT improved CMJ displacement (mean ± SD, 5.3 ± 6.3%), velocity (2.2 ± 2.7%), force (absolute: 10.1 ± 10.1%), and power (absolute: 9.8 ± 7.6%; relative: 6.0 ± 6.6%). HIIT+RT elicited comparable improvements in CMJ velocity only (2.2 ± 2.7%). Compared to RT, RT+HIIT attenuated CMJ displacement (mean difference ± 90%CI, -5.1 ± 4.3%), force (absolute: -8.2 ± 7.1%) and power (absolute: -6.0 ± 4.7%). Only RT+HIIT reduced absolute fat mass (mean ± SD, -11.0 ± 11.7%).ConclusionsIn moderately-active males, concurrent training, regardless of the exercise order, presents a viable strategy to improve lower-body maximal strength and total lean mass comparably to resistance-only training, whilst also improving indices of aerobic fitness. However, improvements in CMJ displacement, force, and power were attenuated when RT was performed before HIIT, and as such, exercise order may be an important consideration when designing training programs in which the goal is to improve lower-body power.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0233134
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30137193

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.