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Using in situ polymerization to increase puncture resistance and induce reversible formability in silk membranes

Emonson, Nicholas S., Eyckens, Daniel J., Allardyce, Benjamin J., Hendlmeier, Andreas, Stanfield, Melissa K., Soulsby, Lachlan C., Stojcevski, Filip and Henderson, Luke C. 2020, Using in situ polymerization to increase puncture resistance and induce reversible formability in silk membranes, Materials, vol. 13, no. 10, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.3390/ma13102252.

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Title Using in situ polymerization to increase puncture resistance and induce reversible formability in silk membranes
Formatted title Using in situ polymerization to increase puncture resistance and induce reversible formability in silk membranes
Author(s) Emonson, Nicholas S.
Eyckens, Daniel J.
Allardyce, Benjamin J.ORCID iD for Allardyce, Benjamin J. orcid.org/0000-0003-4009-3371
Hendlmeier, Andreas
Stanfield, Melissa K.
Soulsby, Lachlan C.
Stojcevski, FilipORCID iD for Stojcevski, Filip orcid.org/0000-0003-3117-0750
Henderson, Luke C.ORCID iD for Henderson, Luke C. orcid.org/0000-0002-4244-2056
Journal name Materials
Volume number 13
Issue number 10
Article ID 2252
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1996-1944
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Technology
Materials Science, Multidisciplinary
Materials Science
aryldiazonium
surface modification
surface chemistry
silk membrane
FIBROIN
FIBERS
COMPOSITES
SURFACES
FILMS
Summary Silk fibroin is an excellent biopolymer for application in a variety of areas, such as textiles, medicine, composites and as a novel material for additive manufacturing. In this work, silk membranes were surface modified by in situ polymerization of aqueous acrylic acid, initiated by the reduction of various aryldiazonium salts with vitamin C. Treatment times of 20 min gave membranes which possessed increased tensile strength, tensile modulus, and showed significant increased resistance to needle puncture (+131%), relative to 'untreated' standards. Most interestingly, the treated silk membranes were able to be reversibly formed into various shapes via the hydration and plasticizing of the surface bound poly(acrylic acid), by simply steaming the modified membranes. These membranes and their unique properties have potential applications in advanced textiles, and as medical materials.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ma13102252
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 091205 Functional Materials
03 Chemical Sciences
09 Engineering
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID Australian Research Council via the ARC Future Fibres Hub (IH140100018)
ARC Training Centre for Lightweight Automotive Structures (IC160100032)
ARC Discovery Program (DP180100094)
Office of Naval Research Global (N62909–18–1-2024)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30137220

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
GTP Research
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.