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Suicide on Facebook-the tales of unnoticed departure in Bangladesh

Soron, Tanjir Rashid and Shariful Islam, Sheikh Mohammed 2020, Suicide on Facebook-the tales of unnoticed departure in Bangladesh, Global mental health, vol. 7, pp. 1-4, doi: 10.1017/gmh.2020.5.

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Title Suicide on Facebook-the tales of unnoticed departure in Bangladesh
Author(s) Soron, Tanjir Rashid
Shariful Islam, Sheikh MohammedORCID iD for Shariful Islam, Sheikh Mohammed orcid.org/0000-0001-7926-9368
Journal name Global mental health
Volume number 7
Article ID e12
Start page 1
End page 4
Total pages 4
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2054-4251
2054-4251
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
Bangladesh
Facebook
Post
Suicide
Livestream
Summary Abstract Facebook has transformed social communication and offers the opportunity to share personal thoughts to people including suicide ideas, plans and attempts. Suicide after Facebook posts has been reported in different parts of the world and it has become a potential area of research for suicide prevention. The analysis of Facebook posts prior to suicide or Facebook live streaming may help in understanding the etiological factors, patterns of communication and possible prevention approaches for a particular community. However, there is a dearth of evidence about suicide incidents after Facebook posts and Facebook live streaming in low and middle-income countries. This study aims to explore the trends and phenomena of suicide after Facebook posts and live streaming in Bangladesh. We conducted an online search using the Google, Facebook and five daily online newspaper archives from 15th August to 15th September 2019. Two research assistants independently conducted the initial searching to find out people who committed suicide after Facebook posts or live streamed suicide in Bangladesh and documented 21 cases. After further evaluation of each of the 21 cases we confirmed 19 cases that met the selection criteria. All of them were under 35-years of age. We observed sucide after Facebook posts were more common in male(78%) e and students. Hanging was the most frequently used method of suicide followed by poisoning. Their Facebook posts and livestream videos indicated relationship problems, academic stress and mental disorders were the common stressors for their suicide. This study lays the foundation for the future researchers to work on suicidal posts on Facebook in Bangladesh and develop culture-specific, real-time suicide preventive systems using a social media platform.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/gmh.2020.5
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30137302

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.