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Can a teacher-led mindfulness intervention for new school entrants improve child outcomes? Protocol for a school cluster randomised controlled trial

Quach, Jon L., Deery, Ben, Kern, Margaret, Clinton, Janet, Gold, Lisa, Orsini, Francesca and Sciberras, Emma 2020, Can a teacher-led mindfulness intervention for new school entrants improve child outcomes? Protocol for a school cluster randomised controlled trial, BMJ Open, vol. 10, no. 5, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-036523.

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Title Can a teacher-led mindfulness intervention for new school entrants improve child outcomes? Protocol for a school cluster randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Quach, Jon L.
Deery, Ben
Kern, Margaret
Clinton, Janet
Gold, LisaORCID iD for Gold, Lisa orcid.org/0000-0002-2733-900X
Orsini, Francesca
Sciberras, EmmaORCID iD for Sciberras, Emma orcid.org/0000-0003-2812-303X
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 10
Issue number 5
Article ID e036523
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BMJ
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-05
ISSN 2044-6055
2044-6055
Keyword(s) child & adolescent psychiatry
community child health
public health
Summary IntroductionThe first years of school are critical in establishing a foundation for positive long-term academic, social and well-being outcomes. Mindfulness-based interventions may help students transition well into school, but few robust studies have been conducted in this age group. We aim to determine whether compared with controls, children who receive a mindfulness intervention within the first years of primary school have better: (1) immediate attention/short-term memory at 18 months post-randomisation (primary outcome); (2) inhibition, working memory and cognitive flexibility at 18 months post-randomisation; (3) socio-emotional well-being, emotion-regulation and mental health-related behaviours at 6 and 18 months post-randomisation; (4) sustained changes in teacher practice and classroom interactions at 18 months post-randomisation. Furthermore, we aim to determine whether the implementation predicts the efficacy of the intervention, and the cost effectiveness relative to outcomes.Methods and analysisThis cluster randomised controlled trial will be conducted in 22 primary schools in disadvantaged areas of Melbourne, Australia. 826 students in the first year of primary school will be recruited to detect between groups differences of Cohen’s d=0.25 at the 18-month follow-up. Parent, teacher and child-assessment measures of child attention, emotion-regulation, executive functioning, socio-emotional well-being, mental health-related behaviour and learning, parent mental well-being, teacher well-being will be collected 6 and 18 months post-randomisation. Implementation factors will be measured throughout the study. Intention-to-treat analyses, accounting for clustering within schools and classes, will adopt a two-level random effects linear regression model to examine outcomes for the intervention versus control students. Unadjusted and analyses adjusted for baseline scores, baseline age, gender and family socioeconomic status will be conducted.Ethics and disseminationEthics approval has been received by the Human Research Ethics Committee at the University of Melbourne. Findings will be reported in peer-review publications, national and international conference presentations and research snapshots directly provided to participating schools and families.Pre-Results Trial registration numberAustralian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12619000326190).
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-036523
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30137515

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.