Cross-sectional metabolic profiles of mental health in population-based cohorts of 11- to 12-year-olds and mid-life adults: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

Lange, K, Lycett, K, Ellul, S, Saffery, R, Mensah, F, Carlin, J, Gold, L, Edwards, B, Azzopardi, P, Sawyer, M, Juonala, M, Burgner, D and Wake, M 2020, Cross-sectional metabolic profiles of mental health in population-based cohorts of 11- to 12-year-olds and mid-life adults: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 54, no. 9, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1177/0004867420924092.

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Title Cross-sectional metabolic profiles of mental health in population-based cohorts of 11- to 12-year-olds and mid-life adults: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
Author(s) Lange, K
Lycett, KORCID iD for Lycett, K orcid.org/0000-0002-8988-4038
Ellul, S
Saffery, R
Mensah, F
Carlin, J
Gold, LORCID iD for Gold, L orcid.org/0000-0002-2733-900X
Edwards, B
Azzopardi, P
Sawyer, M
Juonala, M
Burgner, D
Wake, M
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Volume number 54
Issue number 9
Article ID 0004867420924092
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher SAGE Publishing
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA
Publication date 2020-05-23
ISSN 0004-8674
1440-1614
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
Mental health
biomarkers
adolescence
adulthood
Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
MONOUNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
RELIABILITY
DISORDERS
VALIDITY
SATISFACTION
METAANALYSIS
DEPRESSION
Summary Objective: Poorer mental health in adulthood is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and reduced life expectancy. However, little is known of the molecular pathways underpinning this relationship and how early in life adverse metabolite profiles relate to self-reported variation in mental health. We examined cross-sectional associations between mental health and serum metabolites indicative of cardiovascular health, in large Australian population-based cohorts at two stages of the life-course.
 
Methods: We characterised cross-sectional serum nuclear magnetic resonance metabolite profiles of positively and negatively framed mental health in a large population-based sample of Australian 11- to 12-year-olds (n = 1172; 51% girls) and mid-life adults (n = 1322; mean age 45 years; 87% women). We examined multiple standard self-report mental health scales, spanning psychosocial health, general well-being, life satisfaction, and health-related quality of life. Linear regression was used to investigate the cross-sectional association between mental health and each metabolite (n = 73) in children and adults separately, unadjusted and adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic position and body mass index.
 
Results: Better child and adult mental health were associated with lower levels of the inflammatory marker glycoprotein acetyls, and a favourable, less atherogenic lipid/lipoprotein profile. Patterns of association in children were generally weaker than in adults. Associations were generally modest and partially attenuated when adjusted for body mass index.
 
Conclusions: In general, metabolite profiles associated with better child and adult mental health closely aligned with those predictive of better cardiovascular health in adults. Our findings support previous evidence for the likely bidirectional relationship between mental health and cardiovascular disease risk, by extending this evidence base to the molecular level and in children.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/0004867420924092
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30137523

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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