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Suitability of remediated PFAS-affected soil in cement pastes and mortars

Fehervari, Andras, Gates, Will P., Gallage, Chathuranga and Collins, Francis 2020, Suitability of remediated PFAS-affected soil in cement pastes and mortars, Sustainability, vol. 12, no. 10, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.3390/su12104300.

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Title Suitability of remediated PFAS-affected soil in cement pastes and mortars
Author(s) Fehervari, AndrasORCID iD for Fehervari, Andras orcid.org/0000-0002-4525-4739
Gates, Will P.ORCID iD for Gates, Will P. orcid.org/0000-0001-7388-0289
Gallage, Chathuranga
Collins, FrancisORCID iD for Collins, Francis orcid.org/0000-0001-6331-5390
Journal name Sustainability
Volume number 12
Issue number 10
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-05-25
ISSN 2071-1050
Keyword(s) PFAS
remediated soil
fine aggregate replacement
supplementary cementitious material
low CO2 concrete
sustainable concrete
green concrete
pyrolysis
aggregate shortage
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Green & Sustainable Science & Technology
Environmental Sciences
Environmental Studies
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE PFOS
HEAVY-METAL
ACID PFOA
KAOLINITE
CONTAMINATION
METAKAOLIN
CONCRETE
CLAYS
Summary Australia and many other parts of the world face issues of contamination in groundwater and soils by per-and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). While the pyrolytic treatment of contaminated soils can destroy PFAS, the resulting heat-treated soils currently have limited applications. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of remediated soils in concrete applications. Using heat-treated soil as a fine aggregate, with a composition and particle size distribution similar to that of traditional concrete sands, proved to be a straightforward process. In such situations, complete fine aggregate replacement could be achieved with minimal loss of compressive strength. At high fine aggregate replacement (≥ 60%), a wetting agent was required for maintaining adequate workability. When using the heat-treated soil as a supplementary cementitious material, the initial mineralogy, the temperature of the heat-treatment and the post-treatment storage (i.e., keeping the soil dry) were found to be key factors. For cement mortars where minimal strength loss is desired, up to 15% of cement can be replaced, but up to 45% replacement can be achieved if moderate strengths are acceptable. This study successfully demonstrates that commercially heat-treated remediated soils can serve as supplementary cementitious materials or to replace fine aggregates in concrete applications.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/su12104300
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 090503 Construction Materials
090703 Environmental Technologies
12 Built Environment and Design
Socio Economic Objective 870301 Cement and Concrete Materials
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID ARC SR180100009
Copyright notice ©2020, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30137710

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
GTP Research
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.