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The ripple effect: A digital intervention to reduce suicide stigma among farming men

Kennedy, Alison J., Brumby, Susan A., Versace, Vincent Lawrence and Brumby-Rendell, Tristan 2020, The ripple effect: A digital intervention to reduce suicide stigma among farming men, BMC Public Health, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12889-020-08954-5.

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Title The ripple effect: A digital intervention to reduce suicide stigma among farming men
Author(s) Kennedy, Alison J.ORCID iD for Kennedy, Alison J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4450-8434
Brumby, Susan A.ORCID iD for Brumby, Susan A. orcid.org/0000-0001-6332-3374
Versace, Vincent LawrenceORCID iD for Versace, Vincent Lawrence orcid.org/0000-0002-8514-1763
Brumby-Rendell, Tristan
Journal name BMC Public Health
Volume number 20
Issue number 1
Article ID 813
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-05-29
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Suicide stigma
Suicide literacy
Farmer health
Rural health
Digital intervention
HEALTH-RELATED STIGMA
HELP-SEEKING
SELF-STIGMA
ILLNESS
BEREAVEMENT
ATTITUDES
SCALE
Summary © 2020 The Author(s). Background: Compared with the general population, Australian farmers-particularly men-have been identified as at greater risk of suicide. A complex range of factors are thought to contribute to this risk, including the experience of Stigma. stigma also impacts those who have attempted suicide, their carers, and those bereaved by suicide-manifesting as shame, guilt, social isolation, concealment of death, reduced help seeking and ongoing risk of suicide. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of an intervention, tailored for the farming context, designed to reduce stigma among farming men with a lived experience of suicide. Methods: The digital intervention used an adult learning model providing opportunity to share insights, reflect, learn and apply new knowledge among people with shared farming interests, suicide experience and cultural context. A range of content-tailored to the gender, farming type and suicide experience of participants-included video stories, postcard messages, education and personal goal setting. Pre-and post-assessment of suicide stigma and literacy was complemented by qualitative data collection during the intervention and participant feedback surveys. Results: The intervention was successful in reaching members of the target group from across Australia's rural communities-with diverse geographic locations and farming industries represented. One hundred and sixty-nine participants from the target group (farming males aged 30-64 years) were recruited. While the Stigma of Suicide Scale failed to identify a reduction in self-or perceived-stigma, qualitative data and participant feedback identified behavioural indicators of stigma reduction. Four subthemes-'growth', 'new realisations', 'hope' and 'encouragement'-highlighted attitudinal and behaviour change indicative of reduced stigma associated with mental health and suicide. Participants' baseline suicide literacy (Literacy of Suicide Scale) was high when compared with previous community samples and total literacy scores did not demonstrate significant improvement over time, although literacy about the link between suicide and alcoholism did significantly improve. Conclusions: These results highlight opportunities in groups with high suicide literacy for targeted stigma reduction and suicide prevention efforts for both the target group and other populations within Australia and internationally. Results also highlight the need to reassess how stigma change is understood and evaluated across a wider range of population groups. Trial registration: This research project was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) (ACTRN12616000289415) on 7th March, 2016.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-020-08954-5
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health and Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30137722

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.