It takes a family to lighten the load! The impact of family-to-business support on the stress and creativity of women micro-entrepreneurs in Sri Lanka

Wijewardena, Nilupama, Samaratunge, Ramanie, Kumara, Ajantha Sisira, Newman, Alex and Abeysekera, Lakmal 2020, It takes a family to lighten the load! The impact of family-to-business support on the stress and creativity of women micro-entrepreneurs in Sri Lanka, Personnel Review, vol. 49, no. 9, pp. 1965-1986, doi: 10.1108/PR-05-2019-0251.

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Title It takes a family to lighten the load! The impact of family-to-business support on the stress and creativity of women micro-entrepreneurs in Sri Lanka
Author(s) Wijewardena, Nilupama
Samaratunge, Ramanie
Kumara, Ajantha Sisira
Newman, AlexORCID iD for Newman, Alex orcid.org/0000-0003-1170-8947
Abeysekera, Lakmal
Journal name Personnel Review
Volume number 49
Issue number 9
Start page 1965
End page 1986
Total pages 22
Publisher Emerald Publishing Group
Place of publication Bingley, Eng.
Publication date 2020-04-09
ISSN 0048-3486
1758-6933
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
Industrial Relations & Labor
Psychology, Applied
Management
Business & Economics
Psychology
Informal sector
Stress
Micro-enterprises
Women entrepreneurs
Work demands
DEMANDS-RESOURCES MODEL
JOB DEMANDS
INFORMAL ECONOMY
MODERATING ROLE
WORK
INNOVATION
EXPERIENCE
VARIABLES
PRESSURE
NETWORKS
Summary PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to examine whether family-to-business support acts as a job resource that attenuates the negative effects of work demands on the stress and creativity of women micro-entrepreneurs in the informal sector in Sri Lanka.Design/methodology/approachData from 359 women micro-entrepreneurs and their respective case officers in local government were used to test the hypothesized relationship between work demands and their creativity through the mediating mechanism of stress and the moderating effect of family-to-business support on the said relationship.FindingsWork demands reduced creativity through heightening the levels of stress faced by women micro-entrepreneurs. However, family-to-business support reduced the negative influence of work demands on creativity through stress.Practical implicationsWomen micro-entrepreneurs should build strong family ties to obtain support from family members. In addition, government training programs that target women micro-entrepreneurs should be extended to include their immediate family members.Originality/valueThis paper contributes to the literature by examining whether family-to-business support buffers the negative effects of work demands for women micro-entrepreneurs in the informal sector. In doing so it makes a theoretical contribution by testing the key tenets of the JD-R model in entrepreneurial settings.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/PR-05-2019-0251
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1503 Business and Management
1605 Policy and Administration
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30137792

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
PVC's Office - Business and Law
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