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Comparing computerised dietary analysis with a ready reckoner in a real world setting: Is technology an improvement?

Paciepnik, Jessica and Porter, Judi 2017, Comparing computerised dietary analysis with a ready reckoner in a real world setting: Is technology an improvement?, Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.3390/nu9020099.

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Title Comparing computerised dietary analysis with a ready reckoner in a real world setting: Is technology an improvement?
Author(s) Paciepnik, Jessica
Porter, JudiORCID iD for Porter, Judi orcid.org/0000-0002-7535-1919
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 9
Issue number 2
Article ID 99
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-01-31
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) ready reckoner
computerized dietary analysis
nutritional analysis
Bland-Altman
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
NURSING-HOME RESIDENTS
NUTRITIONAL INTAKE
FOOD-INTAKE
STAFF
ACCURACY
TOOLS
CARE
Summary Ready reckoners are used in the clinical setting as a tool for the estimation of nutrient intake. With increasing opportunities for nutrition research, ready reckoners may provide for a more rapid analysis of nutritional intake than computerised methods, often seen as the gold standard for nutritional analysis. This research aimed to determine the level of agreement between ready reckoner and computerised dietary analysis through a secondary analysis of clinical trial data. Participant food intakes were estimated by trained observers using the one-quarter method. Daily energy and protein intake were estimated by the healthcare network ready reckoner and computerised dietary analysis. Agreement between methods was tested using t-tests, correlations and Bland-Altman plots. A correlation between analysis methods was observed (r = 0.9086 energy, r = 0.8700 protein). Wide limits of agreement were observed for both energy and protein intake. Compared with the computerised method, ready reckoner analysis underestimated energy intake by 600 kJ and protein intake by 5 g. Mean energy and protein intake calculated by each method was significantly different (p < 0.0001 energy, p < 0.0001 protein). No time differences between analysis methods were observed. In the clinical setting, practitioners should be aware of the variability of a ready reckoner compared to computerised dietary analysis. Further investigation into the acceptability of ready reckoners as a reliable method of nutrient intake determination, particularly for analysis of nutrition research, is required.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu9020099
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30138123

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.