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Eating occasion situational factors and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in young adults

McNaughton, Sarah A., Pendergast, Felicity J., Worsley, Francis and Leech, Rebecca M. 2020, Eating occasion situational factors and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in young adults, International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12966-020-00975-y.

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Title Eating occasion situational factors and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in young adults
Author(s) McNaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Pendergast, Felicity J.
Worsley, FrancisORCID iD for Worsley, Francis orcid.org/0000-0002-4635-6059
Leech, Rebecca M.ORCID iD for Leech, Rebecca M. orcid.org/0000-0002-5333-0164
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume number 17
Issue number 1
Article ID 71
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-06-03
ISSN 1479-5868
1479-5868
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
Eating occasion
Eating patterns
Ecological momentary assessment
Situational factors
Sugar-sweetened beverage
Young adults
SOFT DRINK CONSUMPTION
WEIGHT-GAIN
FOOD-INTAKE
US ADULTS
DIETARY BEHAVIOR
LIFE-STYLE
OBESITY
PATTERNS
HEALTH
ASSOCIATIONS
Summary Background: Young adulthood represents an influential transitional period marked by poor dietary habits and excess weight gain. Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) are a major source of excess caloric intake among young adults, yet little is known about the correlates of SSB consumption. This study examines the individual and situational correlates of SSB consumption, using real-time assessment of Australian young adults’ eating occasions. 
 
Methods: Dietary, sociodemographic and health behaviour data were collected during the Measuring EAting in Everyday Life (MEALS) study (n = 675 adults, 18–30 y). Participants reported all foods and beverages consumed over 3–4 non-consecutive days using a real-time Smartphone food diary application (“FoodNow”). For every eating occasion, food and beverage intake was recorded along with situational characteristics (eating location, purchase location, presence of others and activities while eating). A beverage occasion was defined as any eating occasion where a beverage was consumed and a SSB occasion was defined as any eating occasion where a SSB was consumed. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine individual and situational characteristics with SSB intake at beverage occasions (i.e. factors associated with choosing a SSB over other non-alcoholic beverages) and to examine factors associated with consuming a SSB at any occasion where food and/or beverages were consumed.
 
Results: Thirty-five percent of participants consumed SSBs during the recording period (n = 237). Of the 2185 beverage eating occasions reported by SSB consumers, 481 (20%) contained a SSB. SSB were rarely consumed on their own (i.e. other foods were present). Having a lower than tertiary education (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.53 [1.16, 2.01]; p < 0.01); eating in a café/restaurant, compared to at home (3.02 [1.58, 5.78]; p < 0.001), and purchasing beverages from a convenience outlet, compared to a supermarket/grocery store (4.58 [2.85, 7.38]; p < 0.001) were associated with SSB intake at beverage eating occasions. Similar associations were also found when all food and/or beverage eating occasions were examined.
 
Conclusion: In this study, SSB were often consumed with other foods and intake was associated with individual and situational factors. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings and explore how SSB are consumed in relation to their accompanying foods.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-00975-y
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
13 Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30138783

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.