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Knowledge, attitudes and practices of Australian trainee childcare educators regarding their role in the feeding behaviours of young children

Love, Penelope, Walsh, Melissa and Campbell, Karen J. 2020, Knowledge, attitudes and practices of Australian trainee childcare educators regarding their role in the feeding behaviours of young children, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 17, no. 10, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17103712.

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Title Knowledge, attitudes and practices of Australian trainee childcare educators regarding their role in the feeding behaviours of young children
Author(s) Love, PenelopeORCID iD for Love, Penelope orcid.org/0000-0002-1244-3947
Walsh, Melissa
Campbell, Karen J.ORCID iD for Campbell, Karen J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume number 17
Issue number 10
Article ID 3712
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-05-25
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) childcare
childcare educators
child feeding practices
CFAPQ
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
HEAD-START TEACHERS
PRESCHOOLERS PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
DIETARY GUIDELINES
FOOD PROVISION
NUTRITION
PROVIDERS
OBESITY
IMPLEMENTATION
OVERWEIGHT
SERVICES
Summary Background: Early childhood (2–5 years) is acknowledged as a critical time for the establishment of healthy behaviours. The increasing number of children and amount of time spent in childcare provides strong rationale to explore the important role that childcare services and childcare educators play in influencing healthy eating behaviours of young children in their care. Methods: This study used a qualitative exploratory approach to describe the knowledge, attitudes and practices of Australian childcare trainee educators’ regarding their role in the feeding of young children. Results: All participants agreed that feeding of young children was an important part of their role, but described challenges to the promotion of healthy eating and the adoption of responsive child feeding practices. These included personal beliefs and experiences with food, the bi-directional nature of child feeding, conflicting parental requests and/or unsupportive centre-based policies and procedures. Conclusion: Training about responsive child feeding practices within the childcare sector should include all childcare staff; aim to enhance relational efficacy and communication skills with parents; and empower childcare staff to lead organisational change. To support this, childcare centres need to provide coherent centre-based healthy eating policies inclusive of healthy food provision and desirable feeding practices.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17103712
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30138857

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.