Borders, detention, and the disruptive power of the noisy-subject

Ozguc, Umut 2020, Borders, detention, and the disruptive power of the noisy-subject, International political sociology, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 77-93, doi: 10.1093/ips/olz026.

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Title Borders, detention, and the disruptive power of the noisy-subject
Author(s) Ozguc, UmutORCID iD for Ozguc, Umut orcid.org/0000-0001-8662-4882
Journal name International political sociology
Volume number 14
Issue number 1
Start page 77
End page 93
Total pages 17
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2020-03
ISSN 1749-5679
1749-5687
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
International Relations
Political Science
Sociology
Government & Law
MIGRATION
AUSTRALIA
SECURITY
POLITICS
REGIME
LIFE
Summary Violent borders are one of the most pressing ethical and political questions of our time. This article seeks to challenge the violent construction of borders through the concept of noise. Drawing on Michel Serres's philosophy of noise and Marie Thompson's emphasis on its affectiveness, the article shows the generative, disruptive, and affective power of noise at the border. I argue that noise creates a disruption in the system and, in doing so, calls for new encounters and relations that operate within and beyond existing power relations. I suggest that the figure of the noisy-subject creates, interrupts, and disturbs the border. The noisy-subject simultaneously prompts disorder and order on the border and transforms it into a third space that is neither simply captured by the sovereign nor fully emancipated from its power. The border as a third space constantly moves with the affective force of its noisy-subjects.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/ips/olz026
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1606 Political Science
1608 Sociology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139173

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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