Openly accessible

Controlling for openness in the male-dominated collaborative networks of the global film industry

Verhoeven, Deb, Musial, Katarzyna, Palmer, Stuart, Taylor, Sarah, Abidi, Shaukat, Zemaityte, Vejune and Simpson, Lachlan 2020, Controlling for openness in the male-dominated collaborative networks of the global film industry, PloS one, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 1-23, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0234460.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Controlling for openness in the male-dominated collaborative networks of the global film industry
Author(s) Verhoeven, DebORCID iD for Verhoeven, Deb orcid.org/0000-0003-3680-3561
Musial, Katarzyna
Palmer, StuartORCID iD for Palmer, Stuart orcid.org/0000-0002-2517-0597
Taylor, Sarah
Abidi, Shaukat
Zemaityte, VejuneORCID iD for Zemaityte, Vejune orcid.org/0000-0001-9714-7903
Simpson, Lachlan
Journal name PloS one
Volume number 15
Issue number 6
Start page 1
End page 23
Total pages 23
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1932-6203
1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
SOCIAL NETWORKS
GENDER
PERSPECTIVE
COMMUNITY
CAREERS
Summary Studies of gender inequality in film industries have noted the persistence of male domination in creative roles (usually defined as director, producer, writer) and the slow pace of reform. Typical policy remedies are premised on aggregate counts of women as a proportion of overall industry participation. Network science offers an alternative way of identifying and proposing change mechanisms, as it puts emphasis on relationships instead of individuals. Preliminary work on applying network analysis to understand inequality in the film industry has been undertaken. However, in this study we offer a comprehensive approach that enables us to not only understand what inequality in the film industry looks like through the lens of network science but also how we can attempt to address this issue. We offer a data-driven simulation framework that investigates various what-if scenarios when it comes to network evolution. We then assess each of these scenarios with respect to its potential to address gender inequality in the film industry. As suggested by previous studies, inequality is exacerbated when industry networks are most closed. We review evidence from three different national film industries on network relationships in creative teams and identify a high proportion of men who only work with other men. In response to this observation, we test several mechanisms through which industry structures may generate higher levels of openness. Our results reveal that the most critical factor for improving network openness is not simply the statistical improvement of the number of women in a network, nor the removal of men who do not work with women. The most likely behavioural changes to a network will involve the production of connections between women and powerful men.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0234460
Indigenous content off
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139251

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 38 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 19 Jun 2020, 00:28:25 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.