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Art meets sport: what can actor training bring to physical literacy programs?

Barnett, Lisa M., Dennis, Rea, Hunter, Kate, Cairney, John, Keegan, Richard J., Essiet, Inimfon A. and Dudley, Dean A. 2020, Art meets sport: what can actor training bring to physical literacy programs?, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17124497.

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Title Art meets sport: what can actor training bring to physical literacy programs?
Author(s) Barnett, Lisa M.ORCID iD for Barnett, Lisa M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9731-625X
Dennis, ReaORCID iD for Dennis, Rea orcid.org/0000-0002-6214-3504
Hunter, KateORCID iD for Hunter, Kate orcid.org/0000-0002-0977-9730
Cairney, John
Keegan, Richard J.
Essiet, Inimfon A.
Dudley, Dean A.
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 17
Issue number 12
Article ID 4497
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-06
ISSN 1660-4601
Keyword(s) actor training
child
performance
performing art
physical education
theatre
Summary The aim of this communication is to highlight synergies and opportunities between the fields of education, sport and health and the performing arts for the promotion of physical literacy. First, physical literacy is introduced and then defined according to the definition used in this communication. Secondly, we highlight the gap in physical literacy interventions, in that they do not address learning based on a holistic comprehensive definition of physical literacy. Then we provide examples of interventions that do borrow from the arts, such as circus arts, and show how these approaches explicitly link to the discipline of arts. This is followed by program examples, which approach motor and language development from discipline-specific perspectives. Then we introduce actor training (within the discipline of arts) in terms of how this approach may be useful to our understanding of physical literacy and how to expand the conception of physical literacy to include affective meaning making, and tolerance for ambiguity and discomfort in not-knowing. Finally, we conclude with the next step for the bridging of disciplines in order to further our journey to understand and improve physical literacy.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17124497
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 190404 Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies
MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 950105 The Performing Arts (incl. Theatre and Dance)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139361

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Created: Thu, 25 Jun 2020, 11:51:15 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.