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Mollecular decolonization: an Indigenous microcosm perspective of planetary health

Redvers, Nicole, Yellow Bird, Michael, Quinn, Diana, Yunkaporta, Tyson and Arabeena, Kerry 2020, Mollecular decolonization: an Indigenous microcosm perspective of planetary health, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 17, no. 12, Special Issue Planetary Health: From Challenges to Opportunities for People, Place, Purpose and Planet, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17124586.

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Title Mollecular decolonization: an Indigenous microcosm perspective of planetary health
Author(s) Redvers, Nicole
Yellow Bird, Michael
Quinn, Diana
Yunkaporta, TysonORCID iD for Yunkaporta, Tyson orcid.org/0000-0003-2256-3819
Arabeena, Kerry
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 17
Issue number 12
Season Special Issue Planetary Health: From Challenges to Opportunities for People, Place, Purpose and Planet
Article ID 4586
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-06
ISSN 1661-7827
Keyword(s) planetary health
Indigenous health
climate change
environmental health
ecology
health equity
knowledge translation
environmental stewardship
microbiome
Summary Indigenous peoples are resilient peoples with deep traditional knowledge and scientific thought spanning millennia. Global discourse on climate change however has identified Indigenous populations as being a highly vulnerable group due to the habitation in regions undergoing rapid change, and the disproportionate burden of morbidity and mortality already faced by this population. Therefore, the need for Indigenous self-determination and the formal recognition of Indigenous knowledges, including micro-level molecular and microbial knowledges, as a critical foundation for planetary health is in urgent need. Through the process of Indigenous decolonization, even at the smallest molecular scale, we define a method back to our original selves and therefore to our planetary origin story. Our health and well-being is directly reflected at the planetary scale, and we suggest, can be rooted through the concept of molecular decolonization, which through the English language emerged from the ‘First 1000 Days Australia’ and otherwise collectively synthesized globally. It is through our evolving understanding of decolonization at a molecular level, which many of our Indigenous cultural and healing practices subtly embody, that we are better able to translate the intricacies within the current Indigenous scientific worldview through Western forms of discourse.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17124586
Indigenous content off
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139383

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.