Openly accessible

Muscle strength and gait speed rather than lean mass are better indicators for poor cognitive function in older men

Sui, Sophia X., Holloway-Kew, Kara L., Hyde, Natalie K., Williams, Lana J., Leach, Sarah and Pasco, Julie A. 2020, Muscle strength and gait speed rather than lean mass are better indicators for poor cognitive function in older men, Scientific Reports, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-67251-8.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
sui-musclestrengthandgait-2020.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.13MB 7

Title Muscle strength and gait speed rather than lean mass are better indicators for poor cognitive function in older men
Author(s) Sui, Sophia X.ORCID iD for Sui, Sophia X. orcid.org/0000-0001-6388-1261
Holloway-Kew, Kara L.ORCID iD for Holloway-Kew, Kara L. orcid.org/0000-0001-5064-2990
Hyde, Natalie K.ORCID iD for Hyde, Natalie K. orcid.org/0000-0002-0693-2904
Williams, Lana J.ORCID iD for Williams, Lana J. orcid.org/0000-0002-1377-1272
Leach, Sarah
Pasco, Julie A.ORCID iD for Pasco, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Journal name Scientific Reports
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Article ID 10367
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Nature Research
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2020-06-25
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
COGSTATE BRIEF BATTERY
ELDERLY-WOMEN
SARCOPENIA
IMPAIRMENT
DECLINE
PERFORMANCE
HEALTHY
ADULTS
EPIDEMIOLOGY
FRAILTY
Summary We aimed to examine muscle strength, function and mass in relation to cognition in older men. This cross-sectional data-set included 292 men aged ≥60 yr. Handgrip strength (kg) was measured by dynamometry, gait speed by 4-metre walk (m/s) and appendicular lean mass (kg) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Cognition was assessed across four domains: psychomotor function, attention, visual learning and working memory. Composite scores for overall cognition were calculated. Bivariate analyses indicated that handgrip strength and gait speed were positively associated with cognitive function. After accounting for confounders, positive associations between individual muscle (or physical) measures and cognitive performance were sustained for handgrip strength and psychomotor function, gait speed and psychomotor function, gait speed and attention, handgrip strength and overall cognition, and gait speed and overall cognition. In multivariable models, handgrip strength and gait speed independently predicted psychomotor function and overall cognition. No associations were detected between lean mass and cognition after adjusting for confounders. Thus, low muscle strength and slower gait speed, rather than low lean mass, were associated with poor cognition in older men.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-67251-8
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139505

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 14 Abstract Views, 7 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 02 Jul 2020, 14:11:02 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.