Associations of body composition trajectories with bone mineral density, muscle function, falls, and fractures in older men: the concord health and ageing in men project

Scott, David, Seibel, Markus J., Cumming, Robert, Naganathan, Vasi, Blyth, Fiona, Le Couteur, David G., Handelsman, David J., Hsu, Benjamin, Waite, Louise M. and Hirani, Vasant 2020, Associations of body composition trajectories with bone mineral density, muscle function, falls, and fractures in older men: the concord health and ageing in men project, Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological sciences and medical sciences, vol. 75, no. 5, pp. 939-945, doi: 10.1093/gerona/glz184.

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Title Associations of body composition trajectories with bone mineral density, muscle function, falls, and fractures in older men: the concord health and ageing in men project
Author(s) Scott, David
Seibel, Markus J.
Cumming, Robert
Naganathan, Vasi
Blyth, Fiona
Le Couteur, David G.
Handelsman, David J.
Hsu, Benjamin
Waite, Louise M.
Hirani, Vasant
Journal name Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological sciences and medical sciences
Volume number 75
Issue number 5
Start page 939
End page 945
Total pages 7
Publisher Oxford University press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2020-05
ISSN 1079-5006
1758-535X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Geriatrics & Gerontology
Gerontology
Body composition
Bone aging
Falls
Muscle
UNINTENTIONAL WEIGHT-LOSS
PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE
SARCOPENIC OBESITY
RISK
COMMUNITY
ADULTS
STRENGTH
OSTEOPOROSIS
METAANALYSIS
DEFINITIONS
Summary Background: Weight loss increases fracture risk in older adults. We aimed to determine associations of 2-year body composition trajectories with subsequent falls and fractures in older men. Methods: We measured appendicular lean mass (ALM) and total fat mass (FM) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and Year 2 in 1,326 community-dwelling men aged ≥70 and older. Body composition trajectories were determined from residuals of a linear regression of change in ALM on change in FM (higher values indicate maintenance of ALM over FM), and a categorical variable for change in ALM and FM (did not lose [≥-5% change] versus lost [<-5% change]). Bone mineral density (BMD), hand grip strength, and gait speed were assessed at Years 2 and 5. After Year 2, incident fractures (confirmed by radiographical reports) and falls were recorded for 6.8 years. Results: Compared with men who did not lose ALM or FM, men who did not lose ALM but lost FM, and men who lost both ALM and FM, had reduced falls (-24% and-34%, respectively; both p <. 05). Men who lost ALM but did not lose FM had increased falls (incidence rate ratio = 1.73; 95% CI 1.37-2.18). ALM/FM change residuals were associated with improved lumbar spine BMD (B = 0.007; 95% CI 0.002-0.012 g/cm2 per SD increase) and gait speed (0.015; 0.001-0.029 m/s), and reduced hip fractures (hazard ratio = 0.68; 95% CI 0.47-0.99). Conclusions: Fracture risk may be increased in older men who lose higher ALM relative to FM. Weight loss interventions for obese older men should target maintenance of lean mass.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/gerona/glz184
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139938

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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