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Accelerometer-determined physical activity, muscle mass, and leg strength in community-dwelling older adults

Foong, YC, Chherawala, N, Aitken, D, Scott, David, Winzenberg, T and Jones, G 2016, Accelerometer-determined physical activity, muscle mass, and leg strength in community-dwelling older adults, Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 275-283, doi: 10.1002/jcsm.12065.

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Title Accelerometer-determined physical activity, muscle mass, and leg strength in community-dwelling older adults
Author(s) Foong, YC
Chherawala, N
Aitken, D
Scott, DavidORCID iD for Scott, David orcid.org/0000-0001-5226-1972
Winzenberg, T
Jones, G
Journal name Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle
Volume number 7
Issue number 3
Start page 275
End page 283
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Hoboken, N.J.
Publication date 2016-06
ISSN 2190-5991
2190-6009
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Geriatrics & Gerontology
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
Physical activity
Accelerometer
Muscle mass
Strength
BODY-COMPOSITION
AMBULATORY ACTIVITY
CONCORD HEALTH
SARCOPENIA
ASSOCIATIONS
MEN
WOMEN
FALLS
PERFORMANCE
CALIBRATION
Summary Introduction: The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between accelerometer‐determined physical activity (PA), muscle mass, and lower‐limb strength in community‐dwelling older adults. Methods: Six hundred thirty‐six community‐dwelling older adults (66 ± 7 years) were studied. Muscle mass was measured using dual‐energy x‐ray absorptiometry, whilst lower limb strength was measured via dynamometry. We measured minutes/day spent in sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous intensity activity using Actigraph GT1M accelerometers. Results: Participants spent a median of 583(Interquartile ratio (IQR) 522–646), 225(176–271), 27(12–45) and 0(0–0) min in sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous activity, respectively. PA intensity was positively associated with both lean mass percentage and lower limb strength in a dose–response fashion. Sedentary activity was negatively associated with lean mass percentage, but not lower‐limb strength. There was a positive association between PA and appendicular lean mass in men only. There was an interaction between age and activity; as age increased, the magnitude of the association of PA with lean mass percentage decreased. Those who adhered to the Australian Department of Health PA guidelines (moderate/vigorous PA >/=150 min/week) had greater lean mass percentage, appendicular lean mass, and lower limb strength. Conclusions: Using accelerometer technology, both the amount and intensity of accelerometer‐determined PA had an independent, dose–response relationship with lean mass percentage and lower limb strength, with the largest effect for vigorous activity. Time spent in sedentary activity was negatively associated with lean mass percentage, but was not associated with lower limb strength. The magnitude of the association between PA and lean mass percentage decreased with age, suggesting that PA programmes may need to be modified with increasing age.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/jcsm.12065
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0606 Physiology
1103 Clinical Sciences
1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139951

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.