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Exploring factors related to changes in body composition, insulin sensitivity and aerobic capacity in response to a 12-week exercise intervention in overweight and obese women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome

Scott, D, Harrison, CL, Hutchison, S, De Courten, B and Stepto, NK 2017, Exploring factors related to changes in body composition, insulin sensitivity and aerobic capacity in response to a 12-week exercise intervention in overweight and obese women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome, PLoS ONE, vol. 12, no. 8, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0182412.

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Title Exploring factors related to changes in body composition, insulin sensitivity and aerobic capacity in response to a 12-week exercise intervention in overweight and obese women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome
Author(s) Scott, DORCID iD for Scott, D orcid.org/0000-0001-5226-1972
Harrison, CL
Hutchison, S
De Courten, B
Stepto, NK
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 12
Issue number 8
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher PLOS
Place of publication San Francisco, CA
Publication date 2017-08-03
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Polycystic ovary syndrome
exercise
adipose tissue
insulin
glucose
overweight
obesity
fats
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
RESISTANCE
FAT
THERAPY
MUSCLE
CLAMP
Summary Objective: To determine factors associated with differential changes in body fat, insulin resistance and aerobic capacity following a 12-week exercise intervention in overweight and obese women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods: 16 overweight and obese women (9 PCOS; 7 without PCOS) completed a supervised progressive 12-week exercise program. Primary outcomes included changes in indicators of insulin sensitivity (including glucose infusion rate relative to fat-free mass [GIR/FFM]), body composition, and aerobic capacity (VO2 peak; 12 participants only). Comparisons were made between women with and without PCOS, and between participants who lost ≥5% (classified as exercise responders) and <5% (non-responders) in body fat (assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Results: Training decreased body fat percentage by (mean; 95% CI) -2.3%; -5.3, 0.7% in women with PCOS and by -6.4%; -10.9, -1.9% in women without PCOS (P = 0.08). Ten women (7 PCOS; 3 without PCOS) did not reduce body fat by ≥5%. All participants improved VO2 peak (mean change 27%; 16–39%) but four (2 PCOS; 2 without PCOS) demonstrated decreases in GIR/FFM (mean change for whole cohort: 37%; 3–71%). Android-gynoid fat ratio (0.58; 0.51, 0.66 vs 0.46; 0.40, 0.51; P<0.01) was significantly higher and GIR/FFM (6.69; 3.49, 9.90 vs 11.44; 9.15, 13.72 mg/kg/min; P = 0.01) was significantly lower in non-responders compared with responders at baseline, but non-responders had significant post-training decreases in android-gynoid ratio (-0.02; -0.04, -0.01; P = 0.03), and increases in VO2 peak (7.24; 2.28, 12.21 mL/kg/min; P = 0.01) and GIR/FFM (1.44; 0.27, 2.61 mg/kg/ min; P = 0.02). In women with PCOS, pre-training VO2 peak was significantly negatively correlated with change in total body fat (r = -0.75; P = 0.02), and pre-training fasting glucose negatively correlated with changes in VO2 peak (r = -0.76; P = 0.04), but positively correlated with changes in GIR (r = 0.67; P = 0.046). Conclusion: A high proportion of overweight and obese women with PCOS had small reductions in body fat following a 12-week exercise intervention, but nevertheless significantly reduced relative central adiposity and improved aerobic capacity and insulin sensitivity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0182412
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, Scott et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30139959

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.