Nutrient intake, meal timing and sleep in elite male Australian football players.

Falkenberg, E, Aisbett, Brad, Lastella, M, Roberts, S and Condo, Dominique 2020, Nutrient intake, meal timing and sleep in elite male Australian football players., J Sci Med Sport, doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2020.06.011.


Title Nutrient intake, meal timing and sleep in elite male Australian football players.
Author(s) Falkenberg, E
Aisbett, BradORCID iD for Aisbett, Brad orcid.org/0000-0001-8077-0272
Lastella, M
Roberts, S
Condo, DominiqueORCID iD for Condo, Dominique orcid.org/0000-0002-8348-7488
Journal name J Sci Med Sport
Place of publication Australia
Publication date 2020-06-24
ISSN 1878-1861
Keyword(s) Actigraphy
Athletes
Evening meal timing
Protein
Sugar
Summary OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between dietary intake, meal timing and sleep in elite male Australian football players. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. METHODS: Sleep and dietary intake were assessed in 36 elite male Australian Football League (AFL) players for 10 consecutive days in pre-season. Sleep was examined using wrist activity monitors and sleep diaries. Dietary intake was analysed using the smartphone application MealLogger and FoodWorks. Generalised linear mixed models examined the associations between diet [total daily and evening (>6pm) energy, protein, carbohydrate, sugar and fat intake] and sleep [total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), wake after sleep onset (WASO) and sleep onset latency (SOL)]. RESULTS: Total daily energy intake (MJ) was associated with a longer WASO [β=3, 95%CI: 0.2-5; p=0.03] and SOL [β=5, 95%CI: 1-9; p=0.01]. Total daily protein intake (gkg-1) was associated with longer WASO [β=4, 95%CI: 0.8-7; p=0.01] and reduced SE [β=-0.7 CI: -1.3 to -0.2; p=0.006], while evening protein intake (gkg-1) was associated with shortened SOL [β=-2, 95%CI: -4 to -0.4), p=0.02]. Evening sugar intake (gkg-1) was associated with shorter TST [β=-5, 95%CI: -10 to -0.6; p=0.03] and WASO [β=-1, 95%CI: -2 to -0.3; p=0.005]. A longer period between the evening meal consumption and bedtime was associated with a shorter TST [β=-8, 95%CI: -16 to -0.3; p=0.04]. CONCLUSIONS: Evening dietary factors, including sugar and protein intake, had the greatest association with sleep in elite male AFL players. Future research manipulating these dietary variables to determine cause and effect relationships, could guide dietary recommendations to improve sleep in athletes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2020.06.011
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services

Document type: Journal Article
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