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The protective effects of human milk-derived peptides on the pancreatic islet biology

Singh, Amitoj, Enjapoori, Ashwantha Kumar, Gibert, Yann and Dwyer, Karen M. 2020, The protective effects of human milk-derived peptides on the pancreatic islet biology, Biology Open, vol. 9, no. 8, pp. 1-20, doi: 10.1242/bio.049304.

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Title The protective effects of human milk-derived peptides on the pancreatic islet biology
Author(s) Singh, AmitojORCID iD for Singh, Amitoj orcid.org/0000-0001-5439-8032
Enjapoori, Ashwantha KumarORCID iD for Enjapoori, Ashwantha Kumar orcid.org/0000-0002-4376-9720
Gibert, YannORCID iD for Gibert, Yann orcid.org/0000-0001-8208-7223
Dwyer, Karen M.ORCID iD for Dwyer, Karen M. orcid.org/0000-0002-4376-9720
Journal name Biology Open
Volume number 9
Issue number 8
Article ID bio049304
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher The Company of Biologists
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2020-08-15
ISSN 2046-6390
2046-6390
Keyword(s) Bovine β-casomorphin
Human β-casomorphin
Pancreas
Regeneration
Type 1 diabetes
Zebrafish
β-cell
Summary Several epidemiological studies support the protective role of breastfeeding in reducing the risk for type 1 diabetes. Human breast milk is the perfect nutrition for infants and contains many complex proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. In this study, we examined the physiological effects of human milk-derived opioid peptides, β-casomorphins (BCM), and compared them with bovine-milk-derived opioid peptides on pancreatic hormone regulation and β-cell regeneration. Exposure of wild-type zebrafish embryos to 50 µg/ml of human BCM-5 and -7 from 3 days post fertilisation until 6 days post fertilisation resulted in an increased insulin domain of expression while exposure to bovine BCM-5 and -7 significantly reduced the insulin domain of expression as analysed by whole-mount in situ hybridisation. These changes may be accounted for by reduced insulin expression or β-cell number and were mitigated by the µ-opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. The effect of BCM on β-cell regeneration was assessed following ablation of β-cells in Tg (ins: CFP-NTR) zebrafish from 3 days post fertilisation to 4 days post fertilisation, followed by exposure of bovine and human BCM-5 and -7 (50 µg/ml) from 4 days post fertilisation until 7 days post fertilisation. The regenerative capacity of β-cells was not impeded following exposure to human BCM-5 and -7, whereas the capacity of β-cells to regenerate following bovine BCM-5 and -7 exposure was reduced. Our data suggest that human BCM-5 and -7 may promote β-cell development and enable the regeneration of β-cells, while the bovine-milk-derived peptides, BCM-5 and -7, play an opposite role. These data may provide some biological explanation for the protective effect of breastfeeding on the development of type 1 diabetes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1242/bio.049304
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0699 Other Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30140484

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.