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Which values do non-native marine species affect? A case-study exploration of perceived values at threat in Micronesia

Campbell, Marnie L. and Hewitt, Chad L. 2018, Which values do non-native marine species affect? A case-study exploration of perceived values at threat in Micronesia, Frontiers in Marine Science, vol. 5, no. July, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.3389/fmars.2018.00247.

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Title Which values do non-native marine species affect? A case-study exploration of perceived values at threat in Micronesia
Author(s) Campbell, Marnie L.
Hewitt, Chad L.
Journal name Frontiers in Marine Science
Volume number 5
Issue number July
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-07-23
ISSN 2296-7745
Keyword(s) alien species
ecosystem services
impact
marine biosecurity
non-native marine species
risk perception
the economics of ecosystems and biodiversity
values
Summary Impact assessment of non-native species introductions tend to focus on either economic and/or environmental risks. We present work that extends these approaches bringing environmental (ecological) and economic values together with social and cultural considerations. Our approach aims to better inform future non-native species management risk analyses. A triangulation approach involving literature and museum searches, face to face discussions, and questionnaires was undertaken to identify values perceived to be at risk with the arrival of non-native marine species (NMS) in three countries in Micronesia (Guam, the Republic of Palau and Saipan). We identified value sets for a range of stakeholders and subsequently used scenario approaches to determine the values' perceived relative worth (non-monetary) and directional change of worth following a biosecurity incursion. We identified 337 value sub-elements, of which at least 40% are thought to be at risk (their worth would diminish) if a NMS introduction were to occur. Results were used to create Venn diagrams and value networks to aid in understanding the linkages between social, cultural, economic, and environmental values. Additionally the relationship between elicited values and their alignment to Ecosystem Service contribution is identified and discussed. The Venn diagrams and value networks should prove a beneficial tool for understanding citizen concerns around perceived biosecurity risks and developing effective future biosecurity risk communication strategies.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fmars.2018.00247
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0405 Oceanography
0602 Ecology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Campbell and Hewitt
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30140597

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.