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Epibiotic pressure contributes to biofouling invader success

Leonard, Kaeden, Hewitt, Chad L., Campbell, Marnie L., Primo, Carmen and Miller, Steven D. 2017, Epibiotic pressure contributes to biofouling invader success, Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-05470-2.

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Title Epibiotic pressure contributes to biofouling invader success
Author(s) Leonard, Kaeden
Hewitt, Chad L.
Campbell, Marnie L.
Primo, Carmen
Miller, Steven D.
Journal name Scientific Reports
Volume number 7
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Springer Nature
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2017-07-12
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) Invasive species
Coevolution
Summary Reduced competition is a frequent explanation for the success of many introduced species. In benthic marine biofouling communities, space limitation leads to high rates of overgrowth competition. Some species can utilise other living organisms as substrate (epibiosis), proffering a competitive advantage for the epibiont. Additionally, some species can prevent or reduce epibiotic settlement on their surfaces and avoid being basibionts. To test whether epibiotic pressure differs between native and introduced species, we undertook ex situ experiments comparing bryozoan larval settlement to determine if introduced species demonstrate a greater propensity to settle as epibionts, and a reduced propensity to be basibionts, than native species. Here we report that introduced species opportunistically settle on any space (bare, native, or introduced), whereas native species exhibit a strong tendency to settle on and near other natives, but avoid settling on or near introduced basibionts. In addition, larvae of native species experience greater larval wastage (mortality) than introduced species, both in the presence and absence of living substrates. Introduced species' ability to settle on natives as epibionts, and in turn avoid epibiosis as basibionts, combined with significantly enhanced native larval wastage, provides a comprehensive suite of competitive advantages contributing to the invasion success of these biofouling species.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-05470-2
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30140600

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.