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Burial Duration and Frequency Influences Resilience of Differing Propagule Types in a Subtidal Seagrass, Posidonia australis

Campbell, Marnie L. 2016, Burial Duration and Frequency Influences Resilience of Differing Propagule Types in a Subtidal Seagrass, Posidonia australis, PLoS ONE, vol. 11, no. 8, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0161309.

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Title Burial Duration and Frequency Influences Resilience of Differing Propagule Types in a Subtidal Seagrass, Posidonia australis
Formatted title Burial Duration and Frequency Influences Resilience of Differing Propagule Types in a Subtidal Seagrass, Posidonia australis
Author(s) Campbell, Marnie L.
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 11
Issue number 8
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher PLOS
Place of publication San Francisco, CA
Publication date 2016-08-15
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Seedlings
Mesocosms
Sediment
Light pulses
Meristems
Carbohydrates
Leaves
Sedimentation
Summary Sedimentation that leads to periodic, and often prolonged, burial events is becomingmore common on the world's coastlines as human populations expand and create urbanised marine environments. Different seagrass species react differently to sediment burial but many species in the southern hemisphere are yet to be examined. How seagrasses react to burial has restoration implications. There is a need to critically assess seagrass transplant propagule responses to periodic (pulse) and prolonged (press) burial events before selecting the most appropriate species, transplant propagule, and transplant site. In my study, mesocosm experiments, coupled with field measurements were used to assess how sexual (seedlings) and vegetative (sprigs) propagules of Posidonia australis responded to pulse and press burial events. Seedlings were highly susceptible to burial (both pulse and press), with no survival at the end of the experimental period. In contrast, rhizome growth in vegetative propagules was stimulated by pulse burial, although press burial events resulted inmortality. The implication for Posidonia australis restoration efforts in areas where burial is periodic, was that vegetative propagules are optimal transplant units, in comparison to seedlings. Press burial however, renders a transplant site sub-optimal for both seedling and sprig transplants.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0161309
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, Marnie L. Campbell
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30140604

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.