Openly accessible

Protocol for economic evaluation alongside the SHINE (Supporting Healthy Image, Nutrition and Exercise) cluster randomised controlled trial

Brown, Victoria, Williams, Joanne, McGivern, Lisa, Sawyer, Susan, Orellana, Liliana, Luo, Wei, Hesketh, Kylie, Wilfley, Denise E and Moodie, Marj 2020, Protocol for economic evaluation alongside the SHINE (Supporting Healthy Image, Nutrition and Exercise) cluster randomised controlled trial, BMJ open, vol. 10, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-038050.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Protocol for economic evaluation alongside the SHINE (Supporting Healthy Image, Nutrition and Exercise) cluster randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Brown, VictoriaORCID iD for Brown, Victoria orcid.org/0000-0003-2891-9476
Williams, JoanneORCID iD for Williams, Joanne orcid.org/0000-0002-5633-1592
McGivern, Lisa
Sawyer, Susan
Orellana, LilianaORCID iD for Orellana, Liliana orcid.org/0000-0003-3736-4337
Luo, WeiORCID iD for Luo, Wei orcid.org/0000-0002-4711-7543
Hesketh, KylieORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Wilfley, Denise E
Moodie, MarjORCID iD for Moodie, Marj orcid.org/0000-0001-6890-5250
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 10
Article ID e038050
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher BMJ Open
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2044-6055
2044-6055
Keyword(s) health economics
paediatrics
public health
Summary Introduction Limited evidence exists on the cost-effectiveness of interventions to prevent obesity and promote healthy body image in adolescents. The SHINE (Supporting Healthy Image, Nutrition and Exercise) study is a cluster randomised control trial (cRCT) aiming to deliver universal education about healthy nutrition and physical activity to adolescents, as well as targeted advice to young people with body image concerns who are at risk of developing disordered eating behaviours. This paper describes the methods for the economic evaluation of the SHINE cRCT, to determine whether the intervention is cost-effective as an obesity prevention measure.Methods and analysis A public payer perspective will be adopted, with intervention costs collected prospectively. Within-trial cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) and cost-utility analysis (CUA) will quantify the incremental costs and health gains of the intervention as compared with usual practice (ie, teacher-delivered curriculum). CEA will present results as cost per body mass index unit saved. CUA will present results as cost per quality-adjusted life year gained. A modelled CUA will extend the target population, time horizon and decision context to provide valuable information to policymakers on the potential for incremental cost offsets attributable to disease prevention arising from intervention. Intervention costs and effects will be extrapolated to the population of Australian adolescents in Grade 7 of secondary school (approximate age 13 years) and modelled over the cohort’s lifetime. Modelled CUA results will be presented as health-adjusted life years saved and healthcare cost-savings of diseases averted. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios will be calculated as the difference in costs between the intervention and comparator divided by the difference in benefit. Semi-structured interviews with key intervention stakeholders will explore the potential impact of scalability on cost-effectiveness. These data will be thematically analysed to inform sensitivity analysis of the base case economic evaluation, such that cost-effectiveness evidence is reflective of the potential for scalability. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained from the Deakin University Human Research Ethics Committee (#2017–269) and the Victorian Department of Education and Training (#2018_003630). Study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed academic papers and participating schools will receive annual reports over the 3 years of data collection.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-038050
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID NHMRC 1122840
ARC FT130100637
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30140630

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 76 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 05 Aug 2020, 13:25:05 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.