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A hub and spoke network model to analyse the secondary dispersal of introduced marine species in Indonesia

Azmi, Fauziah, Hewitt, Chad L. and Campbell, Marnie L. 2015, A hub and spoke network model to analyse the secondary dispersal of introduced marine species in Indonesia, ICES Journal of Marine Science, vol. 72, no. 3, March/April, pp. 1069-1077, doi: 10.1093/icesjms/fsu150.

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Title A hub and spoke network model to analyse the secondary dispersal of introduced marine species in Indonesia
Author(s) Azmi, Fauziah
Hewitt, Chad L.
Campbell, Marnie L.
Journal name ICES Journal of Marine Science
Volume number 72
Issue number 3
Season March/April
Start page 1069
End page 1077
Total pages 9
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2015-03
ISSN 1054-3139
1095-9289
Keyword(s) dispersal
non-indigenous species
risk management
risk model
shipping
vector
vulnerability
Summary Indonesia is a biodiversity hotspot threatened with new introductions of marine species. As with many countries, Indonesia has a stratified shipping network of international ports linked to a large suite of domestic ports. We developed a hub and spoke network model to examine the risk associated with the secondary transfer of introduced marine species from the port hub of Tanjung Priok in Jakarta Bay to the 33 Indonesian provinces (including other ports in the Jakarta province). An 11-year shipping dataset was used (vessel next port of call records for maritime vessels that originated in Jakarta Bay and that remained in domestic waters) to derive a province ranking of vulnerability. Fifteen provinces represented almost 94% of the traffic frequency, with East Java and Jakarta provinces dominating. All urban provinces featured within the top seven highest frequency traffic provinces. Traffic patterns reflect an intra-coastal reliance on shipping, with traffic frequency decreasing with distance from Jakarta Bay. Provinces were regionalized into three categories (Lampung to East Java, Makassar Straits, and Malacca Straits) each with different vulnerabilities based on their values.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/icesjms/fsu150
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30140633

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.