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Egg allergy: Diagnosis and immunotherapy

Dona, Dulashi Withanage and Suphioglu, Cenk 2020, Egg allergy: Diagnosis and immunotherapy, International Journal of Molecular Sciences, vol. 21, no. 14, pp. 1-35, doi: 10.3390/ijms21145010.

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Title Egg allergy: Diagnosis and immunotherapy
Author(s) Dona, Dulashi Withanage
Suphioglu, CenkORCID iD for Suphioglu, Cenk orcid.org/0000-0003-0101-0668
Journal name International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume number 21
Issue number 14
Article ID 5010
Start page 1
End page 35
Total pages 35
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1661-6596
1422-0067
Keyword(s) allergy
egg allergens
egg allergy
hypersensitivity
hypoallergens
immunotherapy
recombinant allergens
Summary Hypersensitivity or an allergy to chicken egg proteins is a predominant symptomatic condition affecting 1 in 20 children in Australia; however, an effective form of therapy has not yet been found. This occurs as the immune system of the allergic individual overreacts when in contact with egg allergens (egg proteins), triggering a complex immune response. The subsequent instantaneous inflammatory immune response is characterized by the excessive production of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody against the allergen, T-cell mediators and inflammation. Current allergen-specific approaches to egg allergy diagnosis and treatment lack consistency and therefore pose safety concerns among anaphylactic patients. Immunotherapy has thus far been found to be the most efficient way to treat and relieve symptoms, this includes oral immunotherapy (OIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). A major limitation in immunotherapy, however, is the difficulty in preparing effective and safe extracts from natural allergen sources. Advances in molecular techniques allow for the production of safe and standardized recombinant and hypoallergenic egg variants by targeting the IgE-binding epitopes responsible for clinical allergic symptoms. Site-directed mutagenesis can be performed to create such safe hypoallergens for their potential use in future methods of immunotherapy, providing a feasible standardized therapeutic approach to target egg allergies safely.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijms21145010
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0399 Other Chemical Sciences
0604 Genetics
0699 Other Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30140665

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.