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Impact of axial eye size on retinal microvasculature density in the macular region

Khan, M Hafi, Lam, Andrew KC, Armitage, James A, Hanna, Lisa, To, Chi-Ho and Gentle, Alex 2020, Impact of axial eye size on retinal microvasculature density in the macular region, Journal of clinical medicine, vol. 9, no. 8, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3390/jcm9082539.

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Title Impact of axial eye size on retinal microvasculature density in the macular region
Author(s) Khan, M Hafi
Lam, Andrew KC
Armitage, James AORCID iD for Armitage, James A orcid.org/0000-0002-3762-0911
Hanna, LisaORCID iD for Hanna, Lisa orcid.org/0000-0003-3173-3381
To, Chi-Ho
Gentle, AlexORCID iD for Gentle, Alex orcid.org/0000-0003-0661-4196
Journal name Journal of clinical medicine
Volume number 9
Issue number 8
Article ID 2539
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-08
ISSN 2077-0383
2077-0383
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
refractive error
myopia
eye size
optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA)
retina
retinal perfusion
vascular perfusion
Summary Mechanical tissue stresses are important contributors to the increased risk of sight-threatening pathology in larger, more myopic eyes. The contribution of altered ocular vasculature to the development of this pathology is less well defined. The current study investigated the impact of eye size on the superficial vasculature of the macula. Subjects (n = 104) aged 18–50, with no history of ocular or vascular disease, or myopia control, were recruited from university staff and student populations in Australia and Hong Kong. Refractive error, ocular size, retinal morphology and vascular morphology were quantified through open field autorefraction, ocular biometry and ocular coherence tomography angiography. Morphology of the superficial retinal capillary plexus was assessed over a 3 × 3 mm fovea-centred area. Perfusion area and vessel length densities were analysed relative to axial eye length and retinal thickness. A significant inverse association was found between axial length and vascular density measures (perfusion area density r2 = 0.186, p < 0.001; and vessel length density r2 = 0.102, p = 0.001). Perfusion area and vessel length densities were reduced by 5.8% (p = 0.001) in the longest, relative to the shortest, eyes. The aggregated ganglion cell layer inner plexiform layer thickness was also inversely associated with eye size (r2 = 0.083, p = 0.003), and reduced, by 8.1% (p < 0.001), in the longest eyes. An inverse association of eye size and superficial retinal vasculature density, that is not simply explained by retinal expansion or image magnification factors, was confirmed. These data support the hypothesis that ongoing metabolic challenges may underlie the development of myopia-related and -associated pathology in larger eyes.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/jcm9082539
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30140820

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.