Moving in and adjusting to a new country without the support of an employer? Tapping into personal dispositions and capabilities to achieve social well-being

Presbitero, Alfredo 2020, Moving in and adjusting to a new country without the support of an employer? Tapping into personal dispositions and capabilities to achieve social well-being, Personnel review, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1108/pr-09-2019-0503.

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Title Moving in and adjusting to a new country without the support of an employer? Tapping into personal dispositions and capabilities to achieve social well-being
Author(s) Presbitero, AlfredoORCID iD for Presbitero, Alfredo orcid.org/0000-0002-3154-9026
Journal name Personnel review
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher Emerald Publishing Limited
Place of publication Bingley, Eng.
Publication date 2020-09-04
ISSN 0048-3486
Keyword(s) Social well-being
Cultural intelligence
Emotional stability
Cross-cultural adjustment
Self-initiated expatriates
Summary Purpose Social well-being is the perception and feeling of belongingness and integration within the community and the broader society. For self-initiated expatriates (SIEs) who rely on their own personal resources and network, the achievement of high levels of social well-being can be challenging (compared to corporate-initiated expatriates who typically receive pre-departure training and relocation assistance from their employers). Hence, in this study, we examine personal factors and theoretically ground how they can be helpful and influence the achievement of high levels of social well-being among SIEs.Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted a survey study (n = 215) involving SIEs to determine how specific personal factors influence the achievement of social well-being.Findings The authors analyzed the data using PROCESS approach and results show that cultural intelligence positively and significantly relates to social well-being. In addition, cross-cultural adjustment is shown to exert an influence as a mediator and further found to be moderated by a personality trait (i.e. emotional stability). Supplementary analyses further show support for the critical role of each of the dimensions of cultural intelligence in the moderated-mediation process.Originality/valueThis study offers novel insights relevant for SIEs who move in to another country and try to socially integrate without any support from employers. The study highlights how personal resources and capabilities could help in the achievement of social well-being. Specifically, the findings suggest the important role of cultural intelligence which needs to be developed prior and after the relocation. Also, the study suggests how a personality trait such as emotional stability can be tapped to increase the likelihood of achieving social well-being among SIEs.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/pr-09-2019-0503
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1503 Business and Management
1605 Policy and Administration
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141476

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
Department of Management
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