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Benchmarking the nutrition-related policies and commitments of major food companies in Australia, 2018

Sacks, Gary, Robinson, Ella, Cameron, Adrian J., Vanderlee, Lana, Vandevijvere, Stefanie and Swinburn, Boyd 2020, Benchmarking the nutrition-related policies and commitments of major food companies in Australia, 2018, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 17, no. 17, pp. 1-23, doi: 10.3390/ijerph17176118.

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Title Benchmarking the nutrition-related policies and commitments of major food companies in Australia, 2018
Author(s) Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Robinson, EllaORCID iD for Robinson, Ella orcid.org/0000-0003-1960-0703
Cameron, Adrian J.ORCID iD for Cameron, Adrian J. orcid.org/0000-0002-0568-5497
Vanderlee, Lana
Vandevijvere, Stefanie
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 17
Issue number 17
Article ID 6118
Start page 1
End page 23
Total pages 23
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
accountability
commercial determinants of health
food company
obesity
policy
population nutrition
PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP
HEALTH
Summary The food industry has an important role to play in efforts to improve population diets. This study aimed to benchmark the comprehensiveness, specificity and transparency of nutrition-related policies and commitments of major food companies in Australia. In 2018, we applied the Business Impact Assessment on Obesity and Population Level Nutrition (BIA-Obesity) tool and process to quantitatively assess company policies across six domains. Thirty-four companies operating in Australia were assessed, including the largest packaged food and non-alcoholic beverage manufacturers (n = 19), supermarkets (n = 4) and quick-service restaurants (n = 11). Publicly available company information was collected, supplemented by information gathered through engagement with company representatives. Sixteen out of 34 companies (47%) engaged with data collection processes. Company scores ranged from 3/100 to 71/100 (median: 40.5/100), with substantial variation by sector, company and domain. This study demonstrated that, while some food companies had made commitments to address population nutrition and obesity-related issues, the overall response from the food industry fell short of global benchmarks of good practice. Future studies should assess both company policies and practices. In the absence of stronger industry action, government regulations, such as mandatory front-of-pack nutrition labelling and restrictions on unhealthy food marketing, are urgently needed
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17176118
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141676

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.