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Impact of protein intake in older adults with sarcopenia and obesity: A gut microbiota perspective

Prokopidis, Konstantinos, Cervo, Mavil May, Gandham, Anoohya and Scott, David 2020, Impact of protein intake in older adults with sarcopenia and obesity: A gut microbiota perspective, Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 8, pp. 1-24, doi: 10.3390/nu12082285.

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Title Impact of protein intake in older adults with sarcopenia and obesity: A gut microbiota perspective
Author(s) Prokopidis, Konstantinos
Cervo, Mavil May
Gandham, Anoohya
Scott, DavidORCID iD for Scott, David orcid.org/0000-0001-5226-1972
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 12
Issue number 8
Article ID 2285
Start page 1
End page 24
Total pages 24
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2072-6643
2072-6643
Keyword(s) gut microbiota
obesity
older adults
protein
sarcopenia
sarcopenic obesity
short-chain fatty acids
skeletal muscle
Summary The continuous population increase of older adults with metabolic diseases may contribute to increased prevalence of sarcopenia and obesity and requires advocacy of optimal nutrition treatments to combat their deleterious outcomes. Sarcopenic obesity, characterized by age-induced skeletal-muscle atrophy and increased adiposity, may accelerate functional decline and increase the risk of disability and mortality. In this review, we explore the influence of dietary protein on the gut microbiome and its impact on sarcopenia and obesity. Given the associations between red meat proteins and altered gut microbiota, a combination of plant and animal-based proteins are deemed favorable for gut microbiota eubiosis and muscle-protein synthesis. Additionally, high-protein diets with elevated essential amino-acid concentrations, alongside increased dietary fiber intake, may promote gut microbiota eubiosis, given the metabolic effects derived from short-chain fatty-acid and branched-chain fatty-acid production. In conclusion, a greater abundance of specific gut bacteria associated with increased satiation, protein synthesis, and overall metabolic health may be driven by protein and fiber consumption. This could counteract the development of sarcopenia and obesity and, therefore, represent a novel approach for dietary recommendations based on the gut microbiota profile. However, more human trials utilizing advanced metabolomic techniques to investigate the microbiome and its relationship with macronutrient intake, especially protein, are warranted.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu12082285
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141706

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.