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Assessing the impacts of daily Cannabis versus alcohol and methamphetamines on young Australians in youth AOD treatment

Reichelt, AC, Collett, JC, Landmann, O and Hallam, Karen 2019, Assessing the impacts of daily Cannabis versus alcohol and methamphetamines on young Australians in youth AOD treatment, BMC Psychiatry, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s12888-019-2403-1.

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Title Assessing the impacts of daily Cannabis versus alcohol and methamphetamines on young Australians in youth AOD treatment
Author(s) Reichelt, AC
Collett, JC
Landmann, O
Hallam, KarenORCID iD for Hallam, Karen orcid.org/0000-0003-0495-5341
Journal name BMC Psychiatry
Volume number 19
Issue number 1
Article ID 416
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2019-12-23
ISSN 1471-244X
Keyword(s) Cannabis
Substance abuse
Youth
AOD services
Methamphetamines
Alcohol
Psychosocial
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS
MARIJUANA USE
HEALTH
RISK
SCHIZOPHRENIA
UNEMPLOYMENT
ADOLESCENCE
PROGRESSION
PEOPLE
BRAIN
Summary Background: Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance by Australian young people, including those engaged with youth alcohol and other drug (AOD) systems. While recreational cannabis use in young people may be a developmental activity for some, for others, this usage becomes regular and be associated with poorer long term outcomes. This study reports on the rates of cannabis use and co-existing psychosocial complexity factors in the Youth Needs Census (2013 and 2016) where workers report on all clients in the youth AOD system, a cohort considered highly vulnerable. Methods: Data was examined for two rounds of data collection for the Youth Needs Census, including 823 youth AOD service engaged young people in 2016 and 1000 AOD service engaged young people in 2013, to identify usage rates, psychosocial outcomes, and changes over time. Results: Daily use of cannabis alone significantly exceeded daily usage rates for methamphetamines, alcohol, and cannabis used alongside other substances. Daily cannabis use was significantly associated with mental health problems, employment problems, education problems, family problems, and housing problems. Daily cannabis use was associated with most psychosocial complexity factors to the same extent as daily methamphetamine use and daily alcohol use, with daily cannabis users only showing lower incidence of the drug-related harm measure. Notably, daily cannabis use also increased from 2013 (47.5%) to 2016 (54.2%). Conclusions: It is imperative that the number of individuals using cannabis is considered alongside the severity of harm when assessing the social impact of this substance. Within cannabis users engaged with the youth AOD system, who often have high levels of psychosocial complexity, cannabis is used daily by a large proportion of these youths and may play a role in negatively impacting their lives.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12888-019-2403-1
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2019 The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141820

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.