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Do commencing nursing and paramedicine students differ in interprofessional learning and practice attitudes: Evaluating course, socio-demographic and individual personality effects

Hallam, Karen, Livesay, K, Morda, R, Sharples, J, Jones, A and De Courten, M 2016, Do commencing nursing and paramedicine students differ in interprofessional learning and practice attitudes: Evaluating course, socio-demographic and individual personality effects, BMC Medical Education, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/s12909-016-0605-5.

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Title Do commencing nursing and paramedicine students differ in interprofessional learning and practice attitudes: Evaluating course, socio-demographic and individual personality effects
Author(s) Hallam, KarenORCID iD for Hallam, Karen orcid.org/0000-0003-0495-5341
Livesay, K
Morda, R
Sharples, J
Jones, A
De Courten, M
Journal name BMC Medical Education
Volume number 16
Issue number 1
Article ID 80
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-03-03
ISSN 1472-6920
Keyword(s) Interprofessional education
Health education
Interprofessional practice
Attitudes
Nursing
Paramedicine
Personality
Socio-demographic
Social Sciences
Education & Educational Research
Education, Scientific Disciplines
Socio demographic
SELF-EFFICACY
SOCIAL IDENTITY
COMMUNICATION-SKILLS
HEALTH-CARE
EDUCATION
INCREASES
FRAMEWORK
OUTCOMES
ENGLISH
Summary Background: Interprofessional education (IPE) requires health students to learn with, from and about each other in order to develop a modern workforce with client-centred care at its core. Despite the client centred focus of IPE, training programs often utilize standard approaches across student cohorts without consideration of discipline, sociodemographic and personality variability that attract students to different health disciplines. Knowing the students who engage in IPE to tailor training may prove as beneficial as knowing the client to delivered individualized client centred care in interprofessional practice (IPP). This research investigates whether students commencing undergraduate nursing and paramedicine degrees ener training with existing demographic and personality differences and, if these are associated with different attitudes towards health care teams and interprofessional education. Method: This online study recruited 160 nursing and 50 paramedicine students in their first week of their undergraduate course. Students completed questionnaires regarding their background, personality (General Perceived Self Esteem Scale, International Mini Markers) and the attitudes towards health care teams scale (ATHCTS) and interprofessional education perception scale (IEPS). Results: Results show that commencing nursing and paramedicine students are demographically different on education, gender, speaking a language other than English at home (LOTE) and their own experience with healthcare. The results further demonstrate that LOTE, discipline being studied and personality factors play a role in perceptions regarding interprofessional training whilst discipline being studied impacted on attitudes towards health care teams in the workforce. Conclusion: These results highlight a number of existing personal and psychological differences between individuals who choose to train in these selected professions. This suggests a need for tertiary education IPE programs to move towards tailoring their education to value this student diversity in the same client centred manner that students are asked to develop clinically.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0605-5
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1117 Public Health and Health Services
1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, Hallam et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141841

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.