Openly accessible

How to estimate community energy flux? A comparison of approaches reveals that size-abundance trade-offs alter the scaling of community energy flux

Ghedini, Giulia, Malerba, Martino E and Marshall, Dustin J 2020, How to estimate community energy flux? A comparison of approaches reveals that size-abundance trade-offs alter the scaling of community energy flux, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 287, no. 1933, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1098/rspb.2020.0995.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title How to estimate community energy flux? A comparison of approaches reveals that size-abundance trade-offs alter the scaling of community energy flux
Author(s) Ghedini, Giulia
Malerba, Martino EORCID iD for Malerba, Martino E orcid.org/0000-0002-7480-4779
Marshall, Dustin J
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume number 287
Issue number 1933
Article ID 20200995
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Royal Society Publishing
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020-08-26
ISSN 0962-8452
1471-2954
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biology
Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
competition
homeostasis
metabolism
phenotype
species interactions
stability
Summary Size and metabolism are highly correlated, so that community energy flux might be predicted from size distributions alone. However, the accuracy of predictions based on interspecific energy–size relationships relative to approaches not based on size distributions is unknown. We compare six approaches to predict energy flux in phytoplankton communities across succession: assuming a constant energy use among species (per cell or unit biomass), using energy–size interspecific scaling relationships and species-specific rates (both with or without accounting for density effects). Except for the per cell approach, all others explained some variation in energy flux but their accuracy varied considerably. Surprisingly, the best approach overall was based on mean biomass-specific rates, followed by the most complex (species-specific rates with density). We show that biomass-specific rates alone predict community energy flux because the allometric scaling of energy use with size measured for species in isolation does not reflect the isometric scaling of these species in communities. We also find energy equivalence throughout succession, even when communities are not at carrying capacity. Finally, we discuss that species assembly can alter energy–size relationships, and that metabolic suppression in response to density might drive the allometry of community energy flux as biomass accumulates.
Language eng
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2020.0995
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 06 Biological Sciences
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141927

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 33 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 15 Sep 2020, 12:24:44 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.