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Seagrass Restoration Is Possible: Insights and Lessons From Australia and New Zealand

Tan, YM, Dalby, O, Kendrick, GA, Statton, J, Sinclair, EA, Fraser, MW, Macreadie, P, Gillies, CL, Coleman, RA, Waycott, M, van Dijk, KJ, Vergés, A, Ross, JD, Campbell, M, Matheson, FE, Jackson, EL, Irving, AD, Govers, LL, Connolly, RM, McLeod, IM, Rasheed, MA, Kirkman, H, Flindt, MR, Lange, T, Miller, Adam D. and Sherman, Craig D. H. 2020, Seagrass Restoration Is Possible: Insights and Lessons From Australia and New Zealand, Frontiers in Marine Science, vol. 7, pp. 1-21, doi: 10.3389/fmars.2020.00617.

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Title Seagrass Restoration Is Possible: Insights and Lessons From Australia and New Zealand
Author(s) Tan, YM
Dalby, O
Kendrick, GA
Statton, J
Sinclair, EA
Fraser, MW
Macreadie, PORCID iD for Macreadie, P orcid.org/0000-0001-7362-0882
Gillies, CL
Coleman, RA
Waycott, M
van Dijk, KJ
Vergés, A
Ross, JD
Campbell, M
Matheson, FE
Jackson, EL
Irving, AD
Govers, LL
Connolly, RM
McLeod, IM
Rasheed, MA
Kirkman, H
Flindt, MR
Lange, TORCID iD for Lange, T orcid.org/0000-0003-2099-0462
Miller, Adam D.ORCID iD for Miller, Adam D. orcid.org/0000-0002-1632-7206
Sherman, Craig D. H.ORCID iD for Sherman, Craig D. H. orcid.org/0000-0003-2099-0462
Journal name Frontiers in Marine Science
Volume number 7
Article ID 617
Start page 1
End page 21
Total pages 21
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-08-14
ISSN 2296-7745
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
seagrass ecosystems
coastal
climate change
marine plants
restoration
ZOSTERA-MARINA EELGRASS
ASSISTED GENE FLOW
POSIDONIA-AUSTRALIS
CLIMATE-CHANGE
ECOSYSTEM SERVICES
CONSERVING BIODIVERSITY
PHYSIOLOGICAL-RESPONSES
MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES
INTERTIDAL SEAGRASSES
VEGETATIVE FRAGMENTS
Summary Seagrasses are important marine ecosystems situated throughout the world’s coastlines. They are facing declines around the world due to global and local threats such as rising ocean temperatures, coastal development and pollution from sewage outfalls and agriculture. Efforts have been made to reduce seagrass loss through reducing local and regional stressors, and through active restoration. Seagrass restoration is a rapidly maturing discipline, but improved restoration practices are needed to enhance the success of future programs. Major gaps in knowledge remain, however, prior research efforts have provided valuable insights into factors influencing the outcomes of restoration and there are now several examples of successful large-scale restoration programs. A variety of tools and techniques have recently been developed that will improve the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and scalability of restoration programs. This review describes several restoration successes in Australia and New Zealand, with a focus on emerging techniques for restoration, key considerations for future programs, and highlights the benefits of increased collaboration, Traditional Owner (First Nation) and stakeholder engagement. Combined, these lessons and emerging approaches show that seagrass restoration is possible, and efforts should be directed at upscaling seagrass restoration into the future. This is critical for the future conservation of this important ecosystem and the ecological and coastal communities they support.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fmars.2020.00617
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0405 Oceanography
0602 Ecology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2020, Tan, Dalby, Kendrick, Statton, Sinclair, Fraser, Macreadie, Gillies, Coleman, Waycott, van Dijk, Vergés, Ross, Campbell, Matheson, Jackson, Irving, Govers, Connolly, McLeod, Rasheed, Kirkman, Flindt, Lange, Miller and Sherman
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141933

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.