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Three Key considerations for biodiversity conservation in multilateral agreements

Burgass, MJ, Larrosa, C, Tittensor, DP, Arlidge, WNS, Caceres, H, Camaclang, A, Hampton, S, McLaverty, C, Nicholson, E, Muposhi, VK, Pinto, CM, Rowland, J, Stevenson, S, Watermeyer, K and Milner-Gulland, EJ 2020, Three Key considerations for biodiversity conservation in multilateral agreements, Conservation Letters, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1111/conl.12764.

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Title Three Key considerations for biodiversity conservation in multilateral agreements
Author(s) Burgass, MJ
Larrosa, C
Tittensor, DP
Arlidge, WNS
Caceres, H
Camaclang, A
Hampton, S
McLaverty, C
Nicholson, EORCID iD for Nicholson, E orcid.org/0000-0003-2199-3446
Muposhi, VK
Pinto, CM
Rowland, JORCID iD for Rowland, J orcid.org/0000-0001-9831-681X
Stevenson, SORCID iD for Stevenson, S orcid.org/0000-0003-4589-352X
Watermeyer, K
Milner-Gulland, EJ
Journal name Conservation Letters
Article ID e12764
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ
Publication date 2020-09-02
ISSN 1755-263X
1755-263X
Keyword(s) Aichi Targets
biodiversity policy
Convention on Biological Diversity
environmental law
Multilateral Environmental Agreements
sustainable development goals
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biodiversity Conservation
Biodiversity & Conservation
PROGRESS
SMART
Summary It is nearly three decades since the world recognized the need for a global multilateral treaty aiming to address accelerating biodiversity loss. However, biodiversity continues to decline at a concerning rate. Drawing on lessons from the implementation of the current strategic plan of the Convention on Biological Diversity and the 2010 Aichi Targets, we highlight three interlinked core areas, which require attention and improvement in the development of the post‐2020 Biodiversity Framework under the Convention on Biological Diversity. They are: (1) developing robust theories of change which define agreed, adaptive plans for achieving targets; (2) using models to evaluate assumptions and effectiveness of different plans and targets; and (3) identifying the common but differentiated responsibilities of different actors/states/countries within these plans. We demonstrate how future multilateral agreements must not focus only on what needs to be done but also on how it should be done, using measurable steps, which make sense at the scales at which biodiversity change happens.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/conl.12764
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30141937

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.