Openly accessible

Screening and characterization of phenolic compounds and their antioxidant capacity in different fruit peels

Suleria, Hafiz AR, Barrow, Colin J and Dunshea, Frank R 2020, Screening and characterization of phenolic compounds and their antioxidant capacity in different fruit peels, Foods, vol. 9, no. 9, pp. 1-26, doi: 10.3390/foods9091206.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Screening and characterization of phenolic compounds and their antioxidant capacity in different fruit peels
Author(s) Suleria, Hafiz ARORCID iD for Suleria, Hafiz AR orcid.org/0000-0002-2450-0830
Barrow, Colin JORCID iD for Barrow, Colin J orcid.org/0000-0002-2153-7267
Dunshea, Frank R
Journal name Foods
Volume number 9
Issue number 9
Article ID 1206
Start page 1
End page 26
Total pages 26
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-09
ISSN 2304-8158
2304-8158
Keyword(s) LC-MS and HPLC
antioxidant activities
flavan-3-ols
flavonoids
fruit peels
hydrolysable and condensed tannins
phenolic acids
polyphenols
Summary Fruit peels have a diverse range of phytochemicals including carotenoids, vitamins, dietary fibres, and phenolic compounds, some with remarkable antioxidant properties. Nevertheless, the comprehensive screening and characterization of the complex array of phenolic compounds in different fruit peels is limited. This study aimed to determine the polyphenol content and their antioxidant potential in twenty different fruit peel samples in an ethanolic extraction, including their comprehensive characterization and quantification using the LC-MS/MS and HPLC. The obtained results showed that the mango peel exhibited the highest phenolic content for TPC (27.51 ± 0.63 mg GAE/g) and TFC (1.75 ± 0.08 mg QE/g), while the TTC (9.01 ± 0.20 mg CE/g) was slightly higher in the avocado peel than mango peel (8.99 ± 0.13 mg CE/g). In terms of antioxidant potential, the grapefruit peel had the highest radical scavenging capacities for the DPPH (9.17 ± 0.19 mg AAE/g), ABTS (10.79 ± 0.56 mg AAE/g), ferric reducing capacity in FRAP (9.22 ± 0.25 mg AA/g), and total antioxidant capacity, TAC (8.77 ± 0.34 mg AAE/g) compared to other fruit peel samples. The application of LC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS tentatively identified and characterized a total of 176 phenolics, including phenolic acids (49), flavonoids (86), lignans (11), stilbene (5) and other polyphenols (25) in all twenty peel samples. From HPLC-PDA quantification, the mango peel sample showed significantly higher phenolic content, particularly for phenolic acids (gallic acid, 14.5 ± 0.4 mg/g) and flavonoids (quercetin, 11.9 ± 0.4 mg/g), as compared to other fruit peel samples. These results highlight the importance of fruit peels as a potential source of polyphenols. This study provides supportive information for the utilization of different phenolic rich fruit peels as ingredients in food, feed, and nutraceutical products.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/foods9091206
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0908 Food Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30142476

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 17 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 08 Oct 2020, 10:57:26 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.