Openly accessible

Investigating both mucosal immunity and microbiota in response to gut enteritis in yellowtail kingfish

Legrand, Thibault P. R. A., Wynne, James W., Weyrich, Laura S. and Oxley, Andrew P. A. 2020, Investigating both mucosal immunity and microbiota in response to gut enteritis in yellowtail kingfish, Microorganisms, vol. 8, no. 9, Special Issue Host–Microbe Interactions in Animal/Human Health and Disease, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.3390/microorganisms8091267.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Investigating both mucosal immunity and microbiota in response to gut enteritis in yellowtail kingfish
Author(s) Legrand, Thibault P. R. A.
Wynne, James W.
Weyrich, Laura S.
Oxley, Andrew P. A.ORCID iD for Oxley, Andrew P. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-6056-7602
Journal name Microorganisms
Volume number 8
Issue number 9
Season Special Issue Host–Microbe Interactions in Animal/Human Health and Disease
Article ID 1267
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2076-2607
2076-2607
Keyword(s) aquaculture
fish
gut
health
immunity
microbiota
mucosa
skin
Summary The mucosal surfaces of fish play numerous roles including, but not limited to, protection against pathogens, nutrient digestion and absorption, excretion of nitrogenous wastes and osmotic regulation. During infection or disease, these surfaces act as the first line of defense, where the mucosal immune system interacts closely with the associated microbiota to maintain homeostasis. This study evaluated microbial changes across the gut and skin mucosal surfaces in yellowtail kingfish displaying signs of gut inflammation, as well as explored the host gene expression in these tissues in order to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the emergence of these conditions. For this, we obtained and analyzed 16S rDNA and transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) sequence data from the gut and skin mucosa of fish exhibiting different health states (i.e., healthy fish and fish at the early and late stages of enteritis). Both the gut and skin microbiota were perturbed by the disease. More specifically, the gastrointestinal microbiota of diseased fish was dominated by an uncultured Mycoplasmataceae sp., and fish at the early stage of the disease showed a significant loss of diversity in the skin. Using transcriptomics, we found that only a few genes were significantly differentially expressed in the gut. In contrast, gene expression in the skin differed widely between health states, in particular in the fish at the late stage of the disease. These changes were associated with several metabolic pathways that were differentially expressed and reflected a weakened host. Altogether, this study highlights the sensitivity of the skin mucosal surface in response to gut inflammation.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/microorganisms8091267
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30142588

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 18 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 22 Sep 2020, 12:36:21 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.