Openly accessible

Exploring the paradoxical relationship of a Creb 3 Regulatory Factor missense variant with body mass index and diabetes among Samoans: Protocol for the Soifua Manuia (Good Health) observational cohort study

Hawley, Nicola L., Pomer, Alysa, Rivara, Anna C., Rosenthal, Samantha L., Duckham, Rachel L., Carlson, Jenna C., Naseri, Take, Reupena, Muagututia Sefuiva, Selu, Melania, Lupematisila, Vaimoana, Unasa, Folla, Vesi, Lupesina, Fatu, Tracy, Unasa, Seipepa, Faasalele-Savusa, Kima, Wetzel, Abigail I., Soti-Ulberg, Christina, Prescott, Angela T., Siufaga, Gloria, Penaia, Corina, To, Sophie B., LaMonica, Lauren C., Lameko, Viali, Choy, Courtney C., Crouter, Scott E., Redline, Susan, Deka, Ranjan, Kershaw, Erin E., Urban, Zsolt, Minster, Ryan L., Weeks, Daniel E. and McGarvey, Stephen T. 2020, Exploring the paradoxical relationship of a Creb 3 Regulatory Factor missense variant with body mass index and diabetes among Samoans: Protocol for the Soifua Manuia (Good Health) observational cohort study, JMIR Research Protocols, vol. 9, no. 7, doi: 10.2196/17329.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
duckham-exploringtheparadoxical-2020.pdf Published Version application/pdf 282.80KB 4

Title Exploring the paradoxical relationship of a Creb 3 Regulatory Factor missense variant with body mass index and diabetes among Samoans: Protocol for the Soifua Manuia (Good Health) observational cohort study
Author(s) Hawley, Nicola L.
Pomer, Alysa
Rivara, Anna C.
Rosenthal, Samantha L.
Duckham, Rachel L.ORCID iD for Duckham, Rachel L. orcid.org/0000-0001-7882-2950
Carlson, Jenna C.
Naseri, Take
Reupena, Muagututia Sefuiva
Selu, Melania
Lupematisila, Vaimoana
Unasa, Folla
Vesi, Lupesina
Fatu, Tracy
Unasa, Seipepa
Faasalele-Savusa, Kima
Wetzel, Abigail I.
Soti-Ulberg, Christina
Prescott, Angela T.
Siufaga, Gloria
Penaia, Corina
To, Sophie B.
LaMonica, Lauren C.
Lameko, Viali
Choy, Courtney C.
Crouter, Scott E.
Redline, Susan
Deka, Ranjan
Kershaw, Erin E.
Urban, Zsolt
Minster, Ryan L.
Weeks, Daniel E.
McGarvey, Stephen T.
Journal name JMIR Research Protocols
Volume number 9
Issue number 7
Article ID e17329
Total pages 16
Publisher J M I R Publications
Place of publication Toronto, Canada
Publication date 2020-07-23
ISSN 1929-0748
Keyword(s) CREBRF
Samoa
cohort studies
obesity
type 2 diabetes
Summary Background:The prevalence of obesity and diabetes in Samoa, like many other Pacific Island nations, has reached epidemic proportions. Although the etiology of these conditions can be largely attributed to the rapidly changing economic and nutritional environment, a recently identified genetic variant, rs373863828 (CREB 3 regulatory factor, CREBRF: c.1370G>A p.[R457Q]) is associated with increased odds of obesity, but paradoxically, decreased odds of diabetes.Objective:The overarching goal of the Soifua Manuia (Good Health) study was to precisely characterize the association of the CREBRF variant with metabolic (body composition and glucose homeostasis) and behavioral traits (dietary intake, physical activity, sleep, and weight control behaviors) that influence energy homeostasis in 500 adults.Methods:A cohort of adult Samoans who participated in a genome-wide association study of adiposity in Samoa in 2010 was followed up, based on the presence or absence of the CREBRF variant, between August 2017 and March 2019. Over a period of 7-10 days, each participant completed the main study protocol, which consisted of anthropometric measurements (weight, height, circumferences, and skinfolds), body composition assessment (bioelectrical impedance and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), point-of-care glycated hemoglobin measurement, a fasting blood draw and oral glucose tolerance test, urine collection, blood pressure measurement, hand grip strength measurement, objective physical activity and sleep apnea monitoring, and questionnaire measures (eg, health interview, cigarette and alcohol use, food frequency questionnaire, socioeconomic position, stress, social support, food and water insecurity, sleep, body image, and dietary preferences). In January 2019, a subsample of the study participants (n=118) completed a buttock fat biopsy procedure to collect subcutaneous adipose tissue samples.Results:Enrollment of 519 participants was completed in March 2019. Data analyses are ongoing, with results expected in 2020 and 2021.Conclusions:While the genetic variant rs373863828, in CREBRF, has the largest known effect size of any identified common obesity gene, very little is currently understood about the mechanisms by which it confers increased odds of obesity but paradoxically lowered odds of type 2 diabetes. The results of this study will provide insights into how the gene functions on a whole-body level, which could provide novel targets to prevent or treat obesity, diabetes, and associated metabolic disorders. This study represents the human arm of a comprehensive and integrated approach involving humans as well as preclinical models that will provide novel insights into metabolic disease.
Language eng
DOI 10.2196/17329
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30143136

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 18 Abstract Views, 4 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 24 Sep 2020, 13:20:43 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.