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Results of the 3 Pillars Study (3PS), a relationship-based programme targeting parent-child interactions, healthy lifestyle behaviours, and the home environment in parents of preschool-aged children: A pilot randomised controlled trial

Marsh, S, Taylor, R, Galland, B, Gerritsen, S, Parag, V and Maddison, R 2020, Results of the 3 Pillars Study (3PS), a relationship-based programme targeting parent-child interactions, healthy lifestyle behaviours, and the home environment in parents of preschool-aged children: A pilot randomised controlled trial, PLoS ONE, vol. 15, no. 9, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0238977.

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Title Results of the 3 Pillars Study (3PS), a relationship-based programme targeting parent-child interactions, healthy lifestyle behaviours, and the home environment in parents of preschool-aged children: A pilot randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Marsh, S
Taylor, R
Galland, B
Gerritsen, S
Parag, V
Maddison, RORCID iD for Maddison, R orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Journal name PLoS ONE
Volume number 15
Issue number 9
Article ID e0238977
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher PLOS
Place of publication San Francisco, CA
Publication date 2020-09-17
ISSN 1932-6203
1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
MUTUALLY RESPONSIVE ORIENTATION
HOUSEHOLD CHAOS
OBESITY PREVENTION
FEEDING PRACTICES
SELF-REGULATION
YOUNG-CHILDREN
INFANT
BARRIERS
SLEEP
INTERVENTIONS
Summary Background: Early childhood is a critical period for the development of obesity, with new approaches to prevent obesity in this age group needed. We designed and piloted the 3 Pillars Study (3PS), a healthy lifestyle programme informed by attachment theory for parents of preschool-aged children.Methods: A 2-arm, randomised controlled pilot study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of 3PS, a 6-week programme involving a half-day workshop plus 6-week access to a study website. The programme was designed to promote routines around healthy lifestyle behaviours, including sleep, limited screen use, and family meals, within the context of positive, reciprocal parent-child interactions. Parents (n = 54) of children aged 2–4 years who regularly exceeded screen use recommendations (≥1 hour per day), were randomised to the 3PS programme (n = 27) or a wait-list control group (n = 27). Child screen time at 6 weeks was the primary endpoint. Frequency of family meals, parent feeding practices, diet quality, sleep, Child Routine Inventory (to assess predictability of commonly occurring routines), and household chaos were also assessed. Study data were collected online at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks via REDCap.Results: No group differences were observed for changes from baseline in screen time (primary endpoint), feeding behaviour scores, Child Routine Inventory scores, or total night time sleep duration at 6 and 12 weeks, although all measures improved in the hypothesised direction in the 3PS group. Compared with controls, the intervention group demonstrated significant improvements from baseline in household chaos scores (i.e. a reduction in chaos) and a number of measures of sleep outcomes, indicating improved sleep continuity. The programme was highly acceptable to parents.Conclusions and recommendations: A relational approach appears promising as a novel way to promote healthy lifestyle behaviours associated with the prevention of childhood obesity in children aged 2–4 years. A larger study is warranted.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0238977
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2020, Marsh et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30143178

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.