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The role of dwelling type on food expenditure: a cross-sectional analysis of the 2015–2016 Australian Household Expenditure Survey

Oostenbach, Laura H., Lamb, Karen E., Dangerfield, Fiona, Poelman, Maartje P, Kremers, Stef and Thornton, Lukar 2020, The role of dwelling type on food expenditure: a cross-sectional analysis of the 2015–2016 Australian Household Expenditure Survey, Public Health Nutrition, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1017/s1368980020002785.

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Title The role of dwelling type on food expenditure: a cross-sectional analysis of the 2015–2016 Australian Household Expenditure Survey
Author(s) Oostenbach, Laura H.
Lamb, Karen E.ORCID iD for Lamb, Karen E. orcid.org/0000-0001-9782-8450
Dangerfield, Fiona
Poelman, Maartje P
Kremers, Stef
Thornton, LukarORCID iD for Thornton, Lukar orcid.org/0000-0001-8759-8671
Journal name Public Health Nutrition
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2020-08-24
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Apartment living
Australia
Dwelling type
Food expenditure
Food purchasing
Summary Objective:To explore differences in proportion of food budget and total food expenditure by dwelling type.Design:A cross-sectional study using data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics 2015–2016 Household Expenditure Survey. Food expenditure was examined on multiple categories: fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, pre-prepared meals, meals in restaurants, hotels and clubs, and fast food and takeaway meals, using two-part models and zero-one inflated beta regression models. Dwelling types were categorised as separate house, semi-detached house, low-rise apartment and high-rise apartment.Setting:Australia, 2015–2016.Participants:Seven thousand three hundred and fifty-eight households from greater capital city areas.Results:Households living in high-rise apartments were estimated to allocate a greater proportion of their food budget to meals in restaurants, hotels and clubs, and to spend more (actual dollars) on that category, compared with other dwelling types. No substantial differences were estimated in the proportion of food budget allocated to the other food categories across dwelling types.Conclusions:The dwelling type households live in may play a role in their food budget. Households living in a high-rise apartment may potentially spend more on meals in restaurants, hotels and clubs than those living in other dwelling types. Given the growth in urban population and the changes in living arrangements, findings point to the critical need for a better understanding of the influence of dwelling types on food expenditure and call for research investigating the relationship between the two.
Notes FirstView Article
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/s1368980020002785
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30143232

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.