Silk and wool protein micro-particle reinforced crystalline polylactic acid bio-composites with improved cell interaction for targeted biomedical applications

Bhagabati, Purabi, Bhasney, Siddharth Mohan, Bose, Devleena, Remadevi, Remadevi, Setty, Mohan, Rajkhowa, Rangam and Katiyar, Vimal 2020, Silk and wool protein micro-particle reinforced crystalline polylactic acid bio-composites with improved cell interaction for targeted biomedical applications, ACS Applied Polymer Materials, vol. 2, no. 11, pp. 4739-4751, doi: 10.1021/acsapm.0c00673.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Silk and wool protein micro-particle reinforced crystalline polylactic acid bio-composites with improved cell interaction for targeted biomedical applications
Author(s) Bhagabati, Purabi
Bhasney, Siddharth Mohan
Bose, Devleena
Remadevi, Remadevi
Setty, MohanORCID iD for Setty, Mohan orcid.org/0000-0003-1871-0249
Rajkhowa, RangamORCID iD for Rajkhowa, Rangam orcid.org/0000-0002-6811-9126
Katiyar, Vimal
Journal name ACS Applied Polymer Materials
Volume number 2
Issue number 11
Start page 4739
End page 4751
Total pages 13
Publisher American Chemical Society (ACS)
Place of publication Washington, D.C.
Publication date 2020-11-13
Keyword(s) silk
wool
poly (lactic acid)
bio-composite
crystallization
biocompatibility
Summary Silk fibroin and wool keratin are easily available biocompatible structural protein fibers with cell adhesion properties. Bottom-up approaches to convert silk and wool fibers to biomaterials of different forms require harsh chemicals and result in materials with poor mechanical properties. In this work, microparticles were prepared from wool and three types of silk fibers by a top-down approach, which is scalable and requires less processing as compared to other bottom up approaches. The fabricated microparticles (5 wt %) were added during melt extrusion of poly(lactic acid) [PLA] to create hybrid biocomposites. Thermal stability of these protein particles in retaining the native structure present in fibers, particularly in silk varieties containing poly-alanine [poly(Ala)] domains, allowed their inclusion in melt-based processing without thermal degradation. The influence of protein microparticles of different amino acid compositions of silk and wool on molecular weight, crystal growth, microstructure, and mechanical, thermal, hydrophilic, and cell compatibility of PLA was investigated. Crystal density of PLA was increased up to 4.5 times and % crystallinity was increased up to 2 times on the addition of the particle fillers. Silk-containing amino acid repeats of poly(Ala) domains were found to be more effective fillers and had good interfacial adhesion with PLA, while the interaction between PLA and wool was poor. Silk fillers produced more hydrophilic biocomposites and supported higher activity of UMR 106 cells in comparison to neat PLA. PLA is gaining increasing attention from the research community and the biomedical industries as a potential alternate to metal implants in bone fixation devices. The study demonstrates that silk particles, particularly those with a poly(Ala) sequence, amplify the acceptability of PLA biocomposites as advanced biodegradable composites for targeted biomedical applications such as bone-fixation devices.
Language eng
DOI 10.1021/acsapm.0c00673
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 090301 Biomaterials
091209 Polymers and Plastics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID Australian Academy of Science through Australia India Strategic Research Fund
Australian Research Council Future Fiber Hub
Centre of Excellence for Sustainable polymers (CoE-Suspol) funded by the Department of Chemicals and Petrochemicals, Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers, Government of India
Copyright notice ©2020, American Chemical Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30143330

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
GTP Research
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 11 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 30 Sep 2020, 08:09:40 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.