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Phragmites australis associates with belowground fungal communities characterized by high diversity and pathogen abundance

Schroeder, Carolyn S., Halbrook, Susannah, Birnbaum, Christina, Waryszak, Pawel, Wilber, William and Farrer, Emily C. 2020, Phragmites australis associates with belowground fungal communities characterized by high diversity and pathogen abundance, Diversity, vol. 12, no. 9, pp. 363-363, doi: 10.3390/d12090363.

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Title Phragmites australis associates with belowground fungal communities characterized by high diversity and pathogen abundance
Author(s) Schroeder, Carolyn S.
Halbrook, Susannah
Birnbaum, Christina
Waryszak, PawelORCID iD for Waryszak, Pawel orcid.org/0000-0002-4245-3150
Wilber, William
Farrer, Emily C.
Journal name Diversity
Volume number 12
Issue number 9
Start page 363
End page 363
Total pages 16
Publisher M D P I AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020-09-22
ISSN 1424-2818
Keyword(s) invasion
microbes
endosphere
endophytes
pathogens
fungi
phragmites
haplotype I
gulf haplotype
coastal marsh
Summary Microbial symbionts are gaining attention as crucial drivers of invasive species spread and dominance. To date, much research has quantified the net effects of plant–microbe interactions on the relative success of native and invasive species. However, little is known about how the structure (composition and diversity) of microbial symbionts can differ among native and invasive species, or vary across the invasive landscape. Here, we explore the structure of endosphere and soil fungal communities associated with a monoculture-forming widespread invader, Phragmites australis, and co-occurring native species. Using field survey data from marshes in coastal Louisiana, we tested three hypotheses: (1) Phragmites australis root and soil fungal communities differ from that of co-occurring natives, (2) Phragmites australis monocultures harbor distinct fungal communities at the expanding edge compared to the monodominant center, and (3) proximity to the P. australis invading front alters native root endosphere and soil fungal community structure. We found that P. australis cultivates root and soil fungal communities with higher richness, diversity, and pathogen abundances compared to native species. While P. australis was found to have higher endosphere pathogen abundances at its expanding edge compared to the monodominant center, we found no evidence of compositional changes or pathogen spillover in native species in close proximity to the invasion front. This work suggests that field measurements of fungal endosphere communities in native and invasive plants are useful to help understand (or rule out) mechanisms of invasion.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/d12090363
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0301 Analytical Chemistry
0805 Distributed Computing
0906 Electrical and Electronic Engineering
0502 Environmental Science and Management
0602 Ecology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2020, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30143331

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.